you bless my boots off

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by playo, Feb 7, 2009.

  1. playo Member

    Spanish - Spain
    hello!
    please, I'd need to know from a english speaker what this sentence means:
    "you invited me to the dance and kept me in perfect time. you bless my boots off, you do".
    thank you in advance!!
     
  2. Idiomático Senior Member

    Virginia, USA
    Latin American Spanish
    Eres una verdadera bendición para mí. Sí, lo eres.
     
  3. playo Member

    Spanish - Spain
    thank you!!!
    but, what's the meaning of "boots" in that context?
    and what about the first part? do you think that it can be translated as " me invitaste a bailar y me llevaste al ritmo perfecto"?

     
  4. Idiomático Senior Member

    Virginia, USA
    Latin American Spanish
    Boots is part of an untranslatable English figure of speech ("me bendijiste las botas"). Don't try to translate it literally.

    I would say: Me invitaste a bailar y me hiciste llevar el compás perfectamente bien. Eres mi verdadera bendición. Sí, lo eres.
     
  5. playo Member

    Spanish - Spain
    muchas gracias, idiomático!
     
  6. Lis48

    Lis48 Senior Member

    York, England
    English - British
    Bless my boots is just an old BE interjection of surprise e.g. "Well bless my boots, he´s fallen asleep!"
    So personally I would translate you bless my boots off, you do by "You really surprise me!" ¡Qué me sorprendes!
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2009
  7. playo Member

    Spanish - Spain
    I see... I'd better say, then, something like: no dejas de sorprenderme/me sorprendes realmente. what do you think?
    thanks a lot!
     
  8. Lis48

    Lis48 Senior Member

    York, England
    English - British
    If it´s a British text, yes, use a slightly old fashioned Spanish expression of surprise.
    It´s similar to Bless my cotton socks! or Upon my soul! A very polite and lady-like version of ¡Santos Dios!
    It may mean something more literal, as Idiomático suggests, in the States.
    I can only suggest what it would mean in the BE context.
     
  9. cyberpedant

    cyberpedant Senior Member

    North Adams, MA
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    Is there the slightest possibility that you misheard this? Could it have been "blast," not "bless"?
     
  10. playo Member

    Spanish - Spain
    I'm sure it's "bless", I have the original text. the author is river jordan, she's from the USA, I don't know if that BE idiom exists there too...
     
  11. cyberpedant

    cyberpedant Senior Member

    North Adams, MA
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    I've never heard it [eastern US]. But maybe I'm out of touch.);-)
     

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