You don’t look at all a hopeless figure standing there

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longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
Here are some words from the novel Lady Chatterley's Lover( page 267, chapter 13) by Lawrence (planetebook,here):

"……Every beetle finds its own food;not one man is forced to work for me." (by Clifford)
"Their lives are industrialized and hopeless, and so are ours,"she cried.(by Connie)
"I don’t think they are. That’s just a romanticfigure of speech, a relic of the swooning and die-away romanticism. You don’t look at all a hopeless figure standing there, Connie my dear."

I feel the sentence in blue asks Connie not to look at the figure that way. Now I rephrase the sentence as: you mustn't stand there(=doing nothing,I guess) and look at all a hopeless prospect/scene/sight(=figure). And I think the subject of standing is Connie, rather than the figure.

Could you please give me some help?
Thank you in advance

I post this thread twice by mistake. Would you please delete one of them?Thanks
 
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  • waltern

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    The "figure" referred to is Connie - the sentence can be paraphrased "You don't look hopeless, Connie".
     

    waltern

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Thank you two
    But the original sentence is you don't look at all a hopeless figure standing there, not you don't look like all a hopeless figure standing there
    The meaning is the same - "you don't look at all (like) a..." - he's not talking about her "looking at" something.

    The meaning of "look" is that of definition #8 in the WR dictionary:

    "to have an appearance appropriate to or that fits (one's age, circumstances, etc.)"

    Also remember this book is almost 100 years old, and may use language differently than we usually do today.
     
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    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    That sounds reasonable. Thank you again. Now I understand it to be: you are not a hopeless figure at all, who stands there
     
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