you don't have to pay

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Tenacious Learner

Senior Member
Spanish
Hello teachers,
I have no intention of substituting the paraphrase for the original one. It's just to explain the meaning to the students.
Could 'it is not necessary for you to pay' be an appropriate paraphrase for 'you don't have to pay'?
My own sentences. Context:
A: Sheila, you don't have to pay. Peter has invited us, haven't you Peter?
B: Yes, I have.

Thanks in advance.
 
  • Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Certainly, for the purposes of explanation, that will do just fine. (I think that both would be more normal if they were pitched in a future tense).
     

    Tenacious Learner

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    I'm sorry, I'm not sure what you mean by 'cynical', nor why you think it would be best expressed using a particular tense.
    Hello BfN,
    Sorry I've wanted to mean 'sarcastic' instead of 'cynical'. I'm using the present perfect in 'Peter has invited us, haven't you Peter? and the answer, as if Peter has invited them, which in fact he didn't.
    (I think that both would be more normal if they were pitched in a future tense).

    Then, I don't understand what you mean by 'if they were pitched in a future tense? What do you mean by 'they'? What does 'they' substituted in this case?

    TL
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    I see. You're talking about the speaker having created a situation in which Peter feels obliged to pay because the alternative would seem rude.
    Is that it? If so, then you were closer when you said 'cynical'. It's probably more specifically described as an abuse of someone's kindness.

    Again, there is nothing in this exchange that would indicate any level of coercion, at least, it's not present in the words themselves, though it could support that reading.

    As regards 'pitching things in a future tense', I meant that it more naturally come out as "You won't have to pay" (and 'It won't be necessary for you to pay'). (Cross-posted)
     

    Tenacious Learner

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    I see. You're talking about the speaker having created a situation in which Peter feels obliged to pay because the alternative would seem rude.
    Is that it? If so, then you were closer when you said 'cynical'. It's probably more specifically described as an abuse of someone's kindness.

    Again, there is nothing in this exchange that would indicate any level of coercion, at least, it's not present in the words themselves, though it could support that reading.

    As regards 'pitching things in a future tense', I meant that it more naturally come out as "You won't have to pay" (and 'It won't be necessary for you to pay'). (Cross-posted)
    Helo BfN,
    I appreciate your help.

    TL
     
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