You exaggerate in everything

roniy

Senior Member
ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
"You exaggerate in everything"
2 questions :
1) The preposition is correct ?

2) And can you use "blowing up" in this example .... or it doesn't fit here ??

Thanks.
 
  • Moogey

    Senior Member
    USA English
    "In" seems to work, but "at" does as well.

    I can't seem to make sense of "blowing up", in this case, however. You can blow things out of proportion, blow up one's ego, or blow up a building. "You blow up everything you do" sounds like the person's trying to be funny :)

    I hope it helps!

    -M
     

    Fernita

    Senior Member
    castellano de Argentina.
    You exaggerate everything!
    No preposition.

    blow up, among other meanings, means to exaggerate something, but in informal language.
    Examples: His abilities as an actor were blown up by the press.
    The whole affair was blown up by ...

    I don't know whether you can say : 'You blow everything up!' having the same meaning as 'You exaggerate everything!'

    I'm sorry but that's all I can say.
     

    roniy

    Senior Member
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    Moogey You can blow things out of proportion said:
    So if you blow things out of proportion, doesn't it mean that you exaggerate in something ????
     

    Moogey

    Senior Member
    USA English
    roniy said:
    So if you blow things out of proportion, doesn't it mean that you exaggerate in something ????
    No, not exactly. Usually this means something bad. If you blow something out of proportion, you've taken something not so important and made a big (bad) deal over it.

    -M
     

    roniy

    Senior Member
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    Moogey said:
    No, not exactly. Usually this means something bad. If you blow something out of proportion, you've taken something not so important and made a big (bad) deal over it.

    -M
    And that's what exaggerate means, doesn't it ?? exaggerate= think about something more than it really is....

    ????
     

    Moogey

    Senior Member
    USA English
    roniy said:
    And that's what exaggerates mean, doesn't it ?? exaggerate= to think about something more than it really is....

    ????
    There's a little difference. To "blow something out of a proportion" pretty much always means something bad but to exaggerate is not always bad.

    Looking at definitions for this word, example sentences don't show usage of a preposition, but "You exaggerate everything" probably isn't very colloquial, but it may be right. Sorry, I didn't realize this before.

    Final verdict:

    - You exaggerate everything :tick:
    - You exaggerate in everything - may be acceptable

    Please take a look at the WR listing for this word http://www.wordreference.com/definition/exaggerate

    -M
     

    roniy

    Senior Member
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    Moogey said:
    There's a little difference. To "blow something out of a proportion" pretty much always means something bad but to exaggerate is not always bad.

    Looking at definitions for this word, example sentences don't show usage of a preposition, but "You exaggerate everything" probably isn't very colloquial, but it may be right. Sorry, I didn't realize this before.

    Final verdict:

    - You exaggerate everything :tick:
    - You exaggerate in everything - may be acceptable

    Please take a look at the WR listing for this word http://www.wordreference.com/definition/exaggerate

    -M
    Thank you about that ......
    but

    1) Can you give an example with "blow something out of a proportion"??

    Let me give an example and you look how is that :

    "Oh, I hate when you do that. Alwayes when sometihng happenes to you, you blow things out of proportion.Stop doing that"
    How is that???

    2) You said that blow up doesn't mean exxagerate but I looked up in a dictionary and the other guy that posted here said it does make sense , sometimes....
    so you got two different answers.......

    Thanks
     

    Moogey

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I'm not good at making examples, but I found a very good one.

    The Free Dictionary said:
    to behave as if something that has happened is much worse than it really is. They had a minor argument in a restaurant but the press have blown it out of all proportion, speculating about divorce.
    I hope it makes it clearer!

    -M
     

    roniy

    Senior Member
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    Moogey said:
    I'm not good at making examples, but I found a very good one.


    I hope it makes it clearer!

    -M
    Probably I didn't expressed myself well.
    The example you gave, I don't know but to me it looks the same as if you used " exaggerate"

    You could use "exaggerate", right??

    But I think "blow out of proportion" just sounds better even to me, in this example.
    So what I am trying to say is
    what would be your example if you exaggerate in a good situation ???

    and about the second question :

    2) You said that blow up doesn't mean to exxagerate but I looked up in a dictionary and the other guy that posted here said it does make sense , sometimes....
    so you got two different answers.......
     

    Moogey

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Oh, this is hard to describe :( But I have to give you credit for your question and determination to get an appropriate, fulfilling response.

    "exaggerated" in this sentence would make some sense. But "blow it out of proportion" is better because it's more emphatic and describes how something "is much worse than it really is". "To exaggerate" does not mean necessarily describe something "much worse than it really is"

    2. Well that's another opinion. At this point, I would be very grateful for help and opinions from others. This is a big one to handle!

    I hope this is what you were asking about and that it's clear :)

    -M
     

    roniy

    Senior Member
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    Moogey said:
    "To exaggerate" does not mean necessarily describe something "much worse than it really is"

    -M
    First of all thank you for your help, I really appreciate it.

    And what you said is exactly the answer I'm looking for. I just need an example when "exaggerate" doesn't describe somehing much worse than it really is"
    You know what I mean ....??

    Moogey said:
    2. Well that's another opinion. At this point, I would be very grateful for help and opinions from others. This is a big one to handle!

    -M

    And yeah it would be great if some other guys gave any other opinions.

    Thanks.
     

    Moogey

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Exaggerate means to overstate.

    I could see a relatively large house one day and, to emphasize that it's big, I can say it's huge or gigantic. This is exaggeration. I think it's usually for emphasis!

    -M
     

    roniy

    Senior Member
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    Moogey said:
    Exaggerate means to overstate.

    I could see a relatively large house one day and, to emphasize that it's big, I can say it's huge or gigantic. This is exaggeration. I think it's usually for emphasis!

    -M
    Still it's the same meaning as "blow out of proportion"

    Lets take your example again.

    there had a small argument in a restuarant.
    But the press said "They had a big argument that have never seen before"

    So here they also overstate. The describe it biger than it really was.
     

    roniy

    Senior Member
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    Ohhh wait ..........
    I think I am getting it .....

    Yes I think I got this part of the question.

    Now it's the "blow up" part left.
    So I am going to wait for other opinions.

    Thank you so much :)
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    You can say "you blow everything [up] out of proportion", and if this wasn't the English Only forum, I'd give you the Hebrew equivalent. ;)

    (Sorry, I'm not sure if "up" belongs in the idiom or not.)
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Look at Moogey's example.
    Originally Posted by The Free Dictionary
    to behave as if something that has happened is much worse than it really is. They had a minor argument in a restaurant but the press have blown it out of all proportion, speculating about divorce.
    "... the press have exaggerated it ..." sounds very weak in comparison.

    But more important, blowing it out of all proportion is a process involving several tellings and re-tellings of the story, perhaps with each telling exaggerating the story a little further.
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    panjandrum said:
    But more important, blowing it out of all proportion is a process involving several tellings and re-tellings of the story, perhaps with each telling exaggerating the story a little further.
    With all due respect, panj, are sure about that? I have a friend who makes a meal out of any physical indisposition or medical procedure. She exaggerates the danger, the discomfort, and all the rest. When talking to someone else, couldn't I say, "She only had a headache but, as usual, she blew it up out of all proportion when she told me about it." I'm not sure that telling and re-telling is necessary.

    Or maybe I can't use the expression that way? (I am still in semi-lingual mode, recovering from translation OD.)
     

    roniy

    Senior Member
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    Nun-Translator said:
    You can say "you blow everything [up] out of proportion", and if this wasn't the English Only forum, I'd give you the Hebrew equivalent. ;)

    (Sorry, I'm not sure if "up" belongs in the idiom or not.)
    Wait so you are also saying that
    " Blow everthing up" ( without "out of proportion") is also correct ????

    With" out of proportion" I understand from you that it's OK.
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Nun-Translator said:
    With all due respect, panj, are sure about that?
    No, I'm not at all sure now about the telling and re-telling.
    It was the message I got from the quote, but of course your hypochondriac friend can blow it up in one telling.

    Maybe exaggerate is less than blow it up?

    Maybe exaggeration is a overstatement, blowing it up is a narrative process?

    Maybe there's no difference, really?
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    roniy said:
    Wait so you are also saying that
    " Blow everthing up" ( without "out of proportion") is also correct ????

    With" out of proportion" I understand from you that it's OK.
    Actually, I'm not sure about that. I don't think I'd say it without "out of proportion", but is that really a rule? I don't know. Sorry.
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    There are degrees of exaggeration. I think "blowing it up out of all proportion" is a high degree. Embellishment is a slight degree of exaggeration.

    roniy, the word can mean to overstate what is positive as well as what is negative. In fact I think most exaggeration is an attempt to make things sound bigger or better than they are.

    To "blow something up" in this case is to inflate it-- like a balloon. That's the connection with making it bigger than it really is.
    .
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    panjandrum said:
    Maybe exaggerate is less than blow it up?

    Maybe exaggeration is a overstatement, blowing it up is a narrative process?

    Maybe there's no difference, really?
    My sense, without getting too far into existential musings, is that there is no denotative (is that word?) difference, but that there is a difference in register.
     

    roniy

    Senior Member
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    foxfirebrand said:
    To "blow something up" in this case is to inflate it-- like a balloon. That's the connection with making it bigger than it really is.
    .
    I don't really get it.
    You are saying that "blow something up" is not correct in this situation and it's only correct to "blow a ballon up" , to make it bigger.

    And you also said that " blow something up out of proportion" is correct be in a high degree of exaggeration

    Now I am really confused.
    Some says it may be correct and some the opposite :)
    Please help me out :):confused:
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    I think the illustrate was meant to explain that just as we can blow up a balloon to make it bigger, we can blow up a description to make it seem bigger. After the balloon is blown up, it is inflated. Inflated can also be used in a figurative sense.

    The prices here are inflated.
    He has an inflated opinion of himself.

    Does that help at all?
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    imithe
    roniy said:
    "You exaggerate in everything"
    Surely this is - in itself - an exaggeration ;)

    2 questions :
    1) The preposition is correct ?
    I wouldn't use "in", and would probably leave it at "You exaggerate everything", or more likely "You always exaggerate"

    2) And can you use "blowing up" in this example .... or it doesn't fit here ??
    If "blow" is to be used in this way I'd probably say "You blow everything out of all proportion".
     

    river

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    foxfirebrand said:
    There are degrees of exaggeration. I think "blowing it up out of all proportion" is a high degree. Embellishment is a slight degree of exaggeration.

    roniy, the word can mean to overstate what is positive as well as what is negative. In fact I think most exaggeration is an attempt to make things sound bigger or better than they are.

    To "blow something up" in this case is to inflate it-- like a balloon. That's the connection with making it bigger than it really is.
    .
    So would you say that "blowing it up out of all proportion" is an overexaggeration?
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    river said:
    So would you say that "blowing it up out of all proportion" is an overexaggeration?
    Well, unless you're coining a Dubyaism, no. To me the prefix -over implies "too much," and that concept is already contained in the word exaggerate. Conversely, and even more obviously, you can't "underexaggerate."

    Or you're making a joke, and I'm unnecessarily explaining the basis of it? I can't fault you for not using smilies, because I have come out harshly against them, calling them "the death of written language." What a dilemma.

    Am I taking a funny comment too seriously?
    .
     

    river

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    No. I wasn't joking. It occured to me that if there are "degrees of exaggeration," then "overexaggerate" might make sense after all.
     

    Celador

    Senior Member
    English / Scotland
    Nun-Translator said:
    You can say "you blow everything [up] out of proportion", and if this wasn't the English Only forum, I'd give you the Hebrew equivalent. ;)

    (Sorry, I'm not sure if "up" belongs in the idiom or not.)

    I don't think anyone should use "blow up" to a British speaker of English, as it would be interpreted as literally synonymous with "explode".

    I can't speak for American users of English.
     

    southerngal

    Senior Member
    American English
    The verb exaggerate is primarily used as a transitive verb, so it requires a direct object.

    Examples:

    You exaggerate everything.

    She exaggerates the truth.


    It can also be used as an intransitive verb: I wouldn't count on his version of events because he tends to exaggerate.


    I think the other phrase you're talking about is blow out of proportion.

    Examples:

    Don't blow the situation out of proportion.
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    river said:
    No. I wasn't joking. It occured to me that if there are "degrees of exaggeration," then "overexaggerate" might make sense after all.
    In that case let me parse the phrase to mean "degrees within the act of exaggeration," but not beyond it. To go "beyond exaggeration" would still be to exaggerate-- and yet "This is beyond exaggeration" might be an exasperated person's way of saying "now you're really overdoing it."
    .
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    With all due respect, panj, are sure about that? I have a friend who makes a meal out of any physical indisposition or medical procedure. She exaggerates the danger, the discomfort, and all the rest. When talking to someone else, couldn't I say, "She only had a headache but, as usual, she blew it up out of all proportion when she told me about it." I'm not sure that telling and re-telling is necessary.

    Or maybe I can't use the expression that way? (I am still in semi-lingual mode, recovering from translation OD.)
    I don't think re-telling is required. Blowing something out of proportion is simply taking a simple situation and treating it as if it were a major one.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    The verb exaggerate is primarily used as a transitive verb, so it requires a direct object.

    Examples:

    You exaggerate everything.

    She exaggerates the truth.


    It can also be used as an intransitive verb: I wouldn't count on his version of events because he tends to exaggerate.


    I think the other phrase you're talking about is blow out of proportion.

    Examples:

    Don't blow the situation out of proportion.

    Blow out of proportion often carries with it deception (intentional or otherwise) or misrepresentation.

    Here is a list of synonyms for "blow out of proportion" http://thesaurus.com/browse/blow+out+of+proportion

    verb overstate, embellish
    Also the second example you gave, "She exaggerates the truth." does not work for me. "Truth" is an absolute. You cannot exaggerate it. Your other sentence works fine.
     
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