you flatter(ed) me immensely

lgr632525968

Senior Member
Chinese
-You are the best person I have met. You have so many great qualities!
-You flatter(ed) me immensely.

Should I use simple past tense here?

Thank you.
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    The simple present tense would be more natural: "You flatter me, it's quite embarrassing"

    It's also possible to use the present continuous: "Now you're just flattering me - I'm nothing special."

    "You're flattering me" is probably the form I would choose here, since "You flatter me" is a little formal perhaps. I couldn't use "immensely" here, though I could easily say or write "That's immensely flattering."
     

    Eien

    New Member
    arabe
    Hi, I have a question that's close enough to what's being discussed in this thread. I wanted to know exactly how the verb "to flatter" is regarded. I have this impression that this verb has a negative connotation but was wondering if this is always the case. Perhaps not all uses of this verb are negative.

    I'd also like to know how this verb is regarded in this situation:
    Person 1: You have some pretty great ideas.
    Person 2: You flatter me too much.

    Thanks.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It’s not negative at all. We all like to be flattered – i.e. have nice things said about us.

    A more common way than “You flatter me” to accept a compliment of that kind is to say “I’m flattered”.
     

    Eien

    New Member
    arabe
    It’s not negative at all. We all like to be flattered – i.e. have nice things said about us.

    A more common way than “You flatter me” to accept a compliment of that kind is to say “I’m flattered”.
    I see :O
    Thank you for the clarification.
     
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