"You flatter yourself" is a ready reply?

goguma

Member
India-Hindi
(title) "I love you" is without rival the most beloved and abused of flatteries.
"You flatter yourself" is a ready reply.
Celopatra was reputed to have a thousand forms of flattery...

Hi, everyone!
When you say to someone "you flatter yourself" you disapprove of them becase you think they exaggerate their importance too much. But I don't understand why "you flatter yourself" is a ready reply when someone say to you, "I love you." Is it because you don't love her[him] at all although she[he] loves you?
 
  • panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Source.
    In Praise of Flattery, Willis Goth Regier
    Please give clear attribution when you quote something (see rule #16).

    It doesn't make a lot of sense to me.
    It might be suggesting that to profess "I love you" is to claim a personal relationship, which is dismissed as a presumption with "You flatter yourself".
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    I don't think that the phrase "I love you" has anything to do with "You flatter yourself". These three phrases just seem to be referencing flattery and I don't think that they are not connected.
     

    goguma

    Member
    India-Hindi
    I'm sorry. I thought four sentences could be permitted without giving source. I think it's my misunderstanding the rule.

    Thank you anyway, Dimcl and panjandrum for your answers. :)
     

    Ume

    Banned
    Japanese
    Hello.

    "You flatter yourself."
    You say this if someone thinks he is better or more capable than anyone else does, don't you?

    - You think you could be president of the company? You flatter yourself.
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Hello.

    "You flatter yourself."
    You say this if someone thinks he is better or more capable than anyone else does, don't you?

    - You think you could be president of the company? You flatter yourself.
    Yes, which makes it strange in reply to "I love you". Like Panjandrum, all I can think is that the speaker is suggesting that the person saying I love you is flattering themselves that they know the speaker well enough to love them.
     
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