<You getting married that is>, and I was kind of taken aback.

park sang joon

Senior Member
Korean
Miles called his ex-wife.
Miles: You see, Vicki, I heard about this for the first time today. You getting married that is, and I was kind of taken aback. Just hard to believe. I guess I thought maybe there was still a chance for us somewhere down the road and I just...
<From the movie "Sideways">
I think "that is" means "that is to say" and "are" is implied before "getting."
And I'd like to know my thought is right.
Thank you in advance for your help.
 
  • Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    That is to say would mean the same as that is here, yes. The "are" is not implied however - that would make it a full sentence, whereas it is perfectly acceptable as a noun-phrase.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    It's faulty punctuation. You should read it as:
    You see, Vicki, I heard about this for the first time today (... you getting married that is...), and I was kind of taken aback.
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, Keith Bradfor, for your very helpful answer. :)
    Thank you, bennymix, for your message. :)
    1. You see, Vicki, I heard about this for the first time today, you getting married that is, and I was kind of taken aback.
    2. You see, Vicki, I heard about this for the first time today. You getting married that is, I was kind of taken aback.
    I think you meant #1.
    How about #2?
     

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    Please bear in mind that this is SPOKEN. People often make mistakes of phrasing (punctuation) and grammar when speaking, and this is perfectly normal and acceptable. #2 would be perfectly acceptable if spoken, but in written form it looks strange without the "and".
     
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