You got me at that pout

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English nerd

Senior Member
Hindi
A girl goes out to work,she gets the job,but not because of her talent but because of who her parents are. The girl being high in self-esteem, turns down that job. But her dad begins to flutter his eyes and pouts,so that girl says:
You got me at that pout.

What does "got at" mean here?
 
  • manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    You got me at that pout.
    Are you sure it wasn't "You had me at that pout?"
    Either way, I suspect it is a wordplay on "You had me at hello", made famous by that movie with Renee Zellweger and Tom Cruise (the one that I can't remember the name of, I'm afraid :p)
    In other words, your girl changed her mind about the job because of the irresistible pout her father gave her (and at the same time she's telling him that there is no need for a lengthy lecture on why she should take the job anyway) :rolleyes:.

    PS: The phrase is "you got me at <something>" and not "<somebody> got at <something>" - there's a very big difference!
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    But her dad begins to flutter his eyes and pouts,so that girl says: You got me at that pout.
    :confused: Well, you should know since you're reading the story, but I don't understand this at all. Why would her dad flutter his eyes and pout and what does the girl mean by what she said? It might be a play on Renee Zellweger's line (in Jerry Maguire, Manfy) but what does it mean here? We need more context. What happens after her dad pouts?
     

    manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    (in Jerry Maguire, Manfy)
    :thumbsup: :thumbsup: Exactly! That's the one. Thanks!
    Well, "You got me" can be seen as a short form of "you got me convinced".
    When "kids" do something that parents don't like, they usually lecture - at least when you're very young. When you're older and make your own decisions, lecturing only annoys - but with pouting they show that they're unhappy, so just for the sake of getting them out of your hair, you agree with what they want (...just so that they don't have to pout anymore, i.e. don't have to be unhappy anymore... :rolleyes:)
    Your parents never did that to you?? I thought that was international...:cool:
     

    English nerd

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    After that,the girl gives up,and take that job.

    So why "at used"
    Can't it be : You got me(convinced) with this pout.
    You got me" can be seen as a short form of "you got me convinced".
     
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    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    You haven't told us your source yet.

    So why is "at" used"?
    Can't it be : You got me(convinced) with that this pout.
    There's often more than one way to say something, and the writer wrote it the way he liked.

    Your parents never did that to you?? I thought that was international...:cool:
    It just sounds odd to read about a man fluttering his eyes and pouting. Perhaps English Nerd will tell us her source.
     
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    English nerd

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Either way, I suspect it is a wordplay on "You had me at hello"
    What does "had" mean here anyway?

    So the use of "with" is right too?

    My friend sent me a snapshot of an online story.
     
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    manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    Can't it be : You got me(convinced) with this pout.
    Yes, grammatically that's fine - but it would destroy the "punch" of the catchphrase!
    You got me with that pout means "because of that pout" and thus it sounds a lot like a normal, neutral statement.
    You got me at that pout leans more on the movie catchphrase and it specifies a point in time, in this case the very first point in time that her father shows disapproval. By doing so, she also expresses that there is no need for any further convincing or lecture (as normally would be the case...!)

    The implication is subtle but it's there - at least for those, who've seen the Maguire movie.
     

    English nerd

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Have you quoted those words exactly as they appeared in the story? Was it by an English speaker
    Yes.

    You got me with that pout means "because of that pout" and thus it sounds a lot like a normal, neutral statement.
    You got me at that pout leans more on the movie catchphrase and it specifies a point in time, in this case the very first point in time that her father shows disapproval. By doing so, she also expresses that there is no need for any further convincing or lecture (as normally would be the case...!)
    So, I get it!
    It's right but it'll sound a whole lot better,when it's used the way it's meant to be used,i.e, catchphrases are popular, and that's the way natives use them and they sound better that way!;)
    Thank you:)
     
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    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    You had me at "hello" means You had me (convinced me, won me, made me fall in love with you) at the moment you spoke the word "Hello". You did not have to say any more words.

    That is why "at" is used: to mean "at the moment in time when you said/did".

    "You got me at that pout" means the same: At the moment you pouted, I was convinced. You didn't have to say or do anything after that.

    The phrase "You had me at hello." is not correct grammar unless the word "hello" is in quote marks, indicating it is a spoken word this sentence is about, not a word that is in this sentence:

    You had me at "hello".
     
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    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    But her dad begins to flutter his eyes and pouts, so that girl says: You got me at that pout.
    It sounds very unlikely to me. Perhaps the writer had in mind the line from the film other members have mentioned, but the situation and the words "You got me at that pout" seem to me very "off". At best it's an unsuccessful nod to the famous line "You had me at "Hello".
     
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