You got this way all on your own.

emre aydın

Senior Member
Turkish
An FBI agent says to Jordan who is the head of a brokerage firm:

Most of the Wall Street jackasses that I bust, they're to the manor born. Their fathers are douchebags, just like their fathers before them. But you... you got this way all on your own.

(The Wolf of Wall Street)

What does he mean by "get this way" ?

Thanks for your help.
 
  • Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    You can read more about it here. Even if the "manor" version is frequently used (like people pronouncing "ask" as "aks"), it makes no sense in the context of your quote from The Wolf of Wall Street, in which the speaker does not mean that these people are born to great wealth, but that they are born into certain habits or customs (manners).
     

    emre aydın

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    I think he just means that these people are born rich. But Jordan is from a middle class family. Anyway, I already got the answer that I needed. :)

    Thank you both again.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    He says:
    Their fathers are douchebags, just like their fathers before them.
    That's why "manner" is appropriate. He's saying they are douchebags like their fathers and grandfathers before them. They follow the same manner of behaviour as their forefathers.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    He is saying the usual person he arrests was born into a rich family where the father thinks he can do anything he wants because he's rich. He can act like a douchebag and get away with it. He passes that attitude on to his son, who acts the same way.

    The FBI agent is saying that Jordan is, in a way, worse. He wasn't raised by a father like that so he didn't get that attitude passed on to him and has less of an excuse to be like that. But still he acts the same way as those other people.
     

    emre aydın

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    He is saying the usual person he arrests was born into a rich family where the father thinks he can do anything he wants because he's rich. He can act like a douchebag and get away with it. He passes that attitude on to his son, who acts the same way.

    The FBI agent is saying that Jordan is, in a way, worse. He wasn't raised by a father like that so he had less of an excuse to be like that. But still he acts badly like those other people.
    So you agree with "manor", kentix?
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I haven't studied that phrase so I don't know where it originally came from but to me it makes more sense as "manor" in this case. Another way to look at it is to realize that people born in manors have certain manners, so it's all the same.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Both phrases are used, according to this long quote from 'To the manner born' - the meaning and origin of this phrase :

    Any examination of 'to the manner born' has to include a mention of its often-quoted incarnation, 'to the manor born'. That has a similar meaning but stresses manorial birth, that is, it refers to someone born into the nobility.


    The 'manner' version is earlier and there's some debate amongst etymologists as to whether the second of these phrases was coined deliberately as a play on words, or whether it is just a misspelling of 'manner' as 'manor'. The third possibility, that they arose independently, is highly unlikely.


    'To the manner born' was used by, and probably coined by, Shakespeare, in
    Hamlet, 1602:
     

    Trochfa

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Either of the phrases makes sense in this context. They both point to the same thing: Habits, money, status and priviledge, which are inherited rather than earned by an individual. The only one of the two phrases I have ever known, and heard used, is "to the manor born".

    The article quoted by dojibear also says that "to the manor born" appeared in The Times newspaper in 1859, and so I think most people would probably accept it as a valid version by now. :rolleyes:

    It also says:
    "It may well have been coined by mistake but, given its adoption into the language, it's perhaps overly strict to label it as incorrect. It could now be viewed as an example of how language mutates with time."

    I view it in exactly the same way as Merriam-Webster defines it (per post #4):
    "to the manor born
    : born into a wealthy family that has a high social status"

    In the OP, the others the FBI agent has busted were born to become douchebags via inheritance (habits/money/status/priviledge), whereas Jordan has managed to become one entirely due to his own efforts.

    "To the manor born" also implies that they inherit their positions in Wall Street, from father to son, just as a manor is passed on from father to son.
     

    emre aydın

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Either of the phrases makes sense in this context. They both point to the same thing: Habits, money, status and priviledge, which are inherited rather than earned by an individual. The only one of the two phrases I have ever known, and heard used, is "to the manor born".

    The article quoted by dojibear also says that "to the manor born" appeared in The Times newspaper in 1859, and so I think most people would probably accept it as a valid version by now. :rolleyes:

    It also says:
    "It may well have been coined by mistake but, given its adoption into the language, it's perhaps overly strict to label it as incorrect. It could now be viewed as an example of how language mutates with time."

    I view it in exactly the same way as Merriam-Webster defines it (per post #4):
    "to the manor born
    : born into a wealthy family that has a high social status"

    In the OP, the others the FBI agent has busted were born to become douchebags via inheritance (habits/money/status/priviledge), whereas Jordan has managed to become one entirely due to his own efforts.

    "To the manor born" also implies that they inherit their positions in Wall Street, from father to son, just as a manor is passed on from father to son.
    Thank you all for the detailed explanations.
     
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