You had me at your impeccable spelling and grammar.

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EdisonBhola

Senior Member
Korean
On Facebook circulates a funny picture with the caption: "You had me at your impeccable spelling and grammar."

Could anyone tell me what it means?
Does it mean: "I fell for you because of your impeccable spelling and grammar."

If at present the statement still hold, shouldn't it be: "You have had me" instead of "You had me"?

Many thanks!
 
  • Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Does it mean: "I fell for you because of your impeccable spelling and grammar."
    Yes. That's pretty much what it means: I fell for you the moment I noticed your impeccable spelling and grammar.

    There's nothing wrong with the way it's written, Ed. Why is it funny? Is it only used when someone has blundered?
     

    EdisonBhola

    Senior Member
    Korean
    I think it's funny because I doubt anyone will (or would?) fall for someone just because of their impeccable spelling and grammar. :)

    Before I didn't know impeccable can be used to describe spelling and grammar. If the sentence is considered correct by native speakers, then I presume we can also say something like "my spelling and grammar are impeccable"?
     
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    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think it's funny because I doubt anyone will (or would?) fall for someone just because of their impeccable spelling and grammar. :)
    Perhaps that's true on Facebook, Ed, but, let's just say, the joke might not work so well here. ;)

    Before I didn't know impeccable can be used to describe spelling and grammar. If the sentence is considered correct by native speakers, then I presume we can also say something like "my spelling and grammar are impeccable"?
    It's certainly said of a person's grammar, less so of spelling, I'd say, but there's no reason that you couldn't throw modesty aside for a moment to say "my spelling and grammar are impeccable".
     
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    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    'You had me' is perhaps closer to 'you had me hooked', 'you had me interested'. It is also quite probably ironic. Internet writings, and particularly those funny pictures known as lolcats, are famous for their bad grammar and spelling, so this message could be used for that rare person who gets it right, or ironically for most other people.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I suspect it refers to a well-known line from a movie (Jerry Maguire) - "You had me at hello" -
    (from an NPR article on First Impressions)Remember that famous line in the movie Jerry Maguire where Renee Zellweger says to Tom Cruise, "You had me at 'hello' "? Well it turns out there is some scientific evidence to back this up. People use voices to instantly judge people, researchers say.
    On Facebook and other media (where you may not believe the person's picture even if they provide one) your first impression of a person is through their writing/text. Thus if you place high value on spelling and grammar, you will find someone attractive (instantly judge them) if their spelling and grammar are impeccable, even before you actually "meet" them in person.
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Yes, I discovered the Zellweger moment today (whilst doing my research after having posted). I also saw many funny pictures. I couldn't find Mr.Bhola's exact quote, but I found something similar:
    "You had me at your impeccable spelling and correct use of grammar", and it's the caption of a funny picture which reminded me of a former mod's avatar (you know the one).

    You can see it here: (Click). It's a Someecards card, the content of which "consists of parodies of the sentiments found in the traditional Hallmark greeting card, and sometimes features content that could be considered offensive if taken seriously" (Wikipedia).

    I wonder if this is the funny picture circulating among facebook users. It's not as funny some of the other ecards I saw, and I still think that 'impeccable' sits unhappily with 'spelling'.
     
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