You have nothing to be jealous of!

SajadBishop

Senior Member
Farsi
You have nothing to be jealous of!
1- Could this sentence have two meanings? : 1- The first person (the one who said it) can't be jealous of the second one. 2- The second one can't be jealous of the first one.
If so, A) which meaning occured to you when you saw it in this thread? (Which one is commoner or easier to think of for you?)
B) what changes could we make to the sentence to remove the ambiguity?
 
  • pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    To me it means only that the speaker thinks the other person shouldn't be jealous. It says nothing about whether they are jealous of the speaker, or of someone else. I don't see any way this sentence could refer to the speaker's own jealousy, unless of course he was talking to himself.
     

    SajadBishop

    Senior Member
    Farsi
    Actually I was thonking: "You have nothing to be jealous of" can be "You have nothing that makes me jealous of you." but it seems that I was wrong! Thanks pob14.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    Ah, I see . . . I don't think we would say it that way, no; I think it would be "You have nothing for me to be jealous of," if you wanted that meaning.
     

    SajadBishop

    Senior Member
    Farsi
    Hello everyone! I have another question that I'd like to ask:

    pob14 said "You have nothing to be jealous of." means that "the speaker thinks the other person (that is, it's unlikely to refer to any other person) shouldn't be jealous."; I think the reason is that "to be jealous of" still keeps the subject (you) with it (maybe because it's a short sentence or ... !); so if we want to refer to another person, we have to add "for" + "noun or pronoun".

    Let's consider another sentence:
    Mina insisted on going to the park.
    In this sentence, does Mina insist that she goes to the park or it may refer to anyone; for instance, could Mina insisted on going to the park. point to John's going to the park or we still have to say "Mina insisted on John going to the park." ?
    I hope I've made myself clear!:)
     
    Last edited:

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Hello everyone! I have another question that I'd like to ask: Let's consider another sentence: Mina insisted on going to the park.
    This would be better discussed in a new post, however, the answers are very short:
    In this sentence, does Mina insists that she goes to the park
    Yes.
    or it may refer to anyone; for instance, could
    Mina insisted on going to the park. point to John's going to the park
    No
    or we still have to say "
    Mina insisted on John going to the park." ?
    Yes
     
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