You like good, sharp, piercing cold-hearted fucking

longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
Here are some words from the novel Lady Chatterley's Lover(page 304, chapter 14) by Lawrence (planetebook,here):
(background: Mellors told Connie that he believed in being warmhearted, especially being warm-hearted in love, in f u c king with a warm heart. But women don't like it. Even Connie doesn't really like it.)
‘ Even you don’t really like it. You like good, sharp, piercing cold-hearted f u c k ing, and then pretending it’s all sugar. Where’s your tenderness for me? You’re as suspicious of me as a cat is of a dog. ……’

I rephrase the sentence in blue as: You like comfortable(=good), fierce(=sharp), chilly-hearted(=piercing cold-hearted) f u c k ing, and then pretending it's pleasant.
Is that right please?
Thank you in advance
 
  • It think that's a fair rephrasing, except for the first one. "good" can be a lot stronger than comfortable, which more aligns itself with "pleasant", so that nullifies the meaning of the whole sentence.

    Here I think good carries the the connotation of "of excellent quality, highly enjoyable, satisfying."

    "You like good hot animal sex, you go wild during it, but afterwards your pretend it was just a mildly pleasurable experience." is how the contrast between action and words has to be set up.
     
    It's a bit hard to understand this fight, for Mellors is basically saying that Connie, like other women, is a hypocrite.
    They can't admit they like 'animal sex'.

    You’re as suspicious of me as a cat is of a dog. I tell
    you it takes two even to be tender and warm-hearted. You
    love fucking all right: but you want it to be called something
    grand and mysterious, just to flatter your own self-importance.

    This pretense makes the woman seem--to Mellors-- to be cold hearted. For he ideally wants 'warmth' in the
    'animal sex.' That's my reading.

    This exchange is the beginning of a short fight after which M is inclined to leave, but softens.



     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    In that kind of construct (in my opinion) the "good" modifies the following adjectives rather than, or in conjunction with, the noun. "I like a good, cold beer." Obviously you like a good beer because otherwise it wouldn't be good. You like it well chilled. Solidly cold.
     
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