You lose a shilling and find sixpence?

lespaul

New Member
Italian Italy
You lose a shilling and find sixpence?

Is it an idiomatic expression maybe a bit outdated, or does it mean what it says?

Tanx Lesp
 
  • BSmith

    Member
    U.S.A. - English
    A British person may know better, but I'd take it as meaning you lose something small, but find something better. Or from what I read, a shilling is worth more than sixpence, hmm.
     

    nay92

    Member
    English, England
    You lose a shilling and find sixpence?

    Is it an idiomatic expression maybe a bit outdated, or does it mean what it says?

    Tanx Lesp
    Well i think that it means that you loose a little and get more back...i have herad the expression loads of times and i'm told that is what it mean.

    Hope it helps
     

    lespaul

    New Member
    Italian Italy
    I actually thought a shilling is worth more than six pence, maybe Sneaky's suggestion fits better the contest.
    It's a quotation from the film Quadrophenia. The guy has just come out of a trial, he comes into the pub and the bar owner goes "Hey Jimmy,You lose a shilling and find sixpence?eh?". So maybe the intention can be something like "You are still alive after all!" or something like that. What do you think?
    Thanx
     

    BSmith

    Member
    U.S.A. - English
    I actually thought a shilling is worth more than six pence, maybe Sneaky's suggestion fits better the contest.
    It's a quotation from the film Quadrophenia. The guy has just come out of a trial, he comes into the pub and the bar owner goes "Hey Jimmy,You lose a shilling and find sixpence?eh?". So maybe the intention can be something like "You are still alive after all!" or something like that. What do you think?
    Thanx
    I would see how it could mean that.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I think the full expression is 'you look like you've lost a pound and found a penny' or 'you look like you've lost a shilling and found a sixpence'. It's something you say when someone is looking glum, to cheer them up.
     

    lespaul

    New Member
    Italian Italy
    Thank you very much your suggestion is very useful, that's exactly what I translated in Italian, it fits perfectly

    Thanx
     

    MidlandsMezzo

    New Member
    English (UK) United Kingdom
    Hi all

    As a middle-aged woman who recalls pre-decimal currency (pounds, shillings and pence), may I politely point out that that in old money (pre-decimal) six pence was half the value of a shilling, 20 shillings making up a pound.

    Hope this might help.

    Regards

    MidlandsMezzo
     

    Tiridev

    New Member
    English - Australia
    It's a six-year old thread, but I don't think it's been answered properly.

    To lose a shilling and find sixpence basically means to lose something of a certain value only to gain something of lesser value as a mild consolation. So you could expect somebody described as looking like "they lost a shilling and found a sixpence" to appear to be a little bit grumpy/morose, but not furious/devastated.
     
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