You made the oats very wet?

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hectacon

Senior Member
Hindi
You made the oats very wet?

What I mean to say that , the person making the oats put lot of milk into the mixture while cooking.

Now what adjective should I use, Oats very soft/wetly etc.
 
  • What type of dish are you referring to? Oatmeal/porridge?

    I would say "you made the oatmeal too runny".

    The same term can be used to describe eggs sunny side up. Some people like them runny, others like them well done.
    The term "watery" can also be used, especially when talking about soup.
     

    hectacon

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    What type of dish are you referring to? Oatmeal/porridge?

    I would say "you made the oatmeal too runny".

    The same term can be used to describe eggs sunny side up. Some people like them runny, others like them well done.
    The term "watery" can also be used, especially when talking about soup.









    I didn't know these dish is called porridge. I only thought I was eating oatmeal all this time.




    We have our own dish which is similar to this porridge. Now give me some 'word" which I can use anytime for any dish when the dish is too softy/watery for the liking's. I might like to use that word for noodles also.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    (Neither of those dishes looks like oatmeal. They're not even the right color. ;))
    Oatmeal can be too thin or watery if there is too much liquid in it.
    Noodles are not supposed to be a solid substance (each noodle is solid, but the noodles together aren't) and are often part of a soup so that can't possibly apply.
     

    hectacon

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    (Neither of those dishes looks like oatmeal. They're not even the right color. ;))
    Oatmeal can be too thin or watery if there is too much liquid in it.
    Noodles are not supposed to be a solid substance (each noodle is solid, but the noodles together aren't) and are often part of a soup so that can't possibly apply.
    <-----Off-topic comments and Hindi word removed by moderator (Florentia52)----->
    Can I say watery for my previous photos.:cool:
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Because the one below is called Kheer.:mad: . If You eat this one time , you will become addicted to it.:D .
    You perhaps don't know I from the land of CURRY.
    I know what kheer is. It's a pudding with rice and is not at all like oatmeal. Now we need to discuss the consistency of the pudding and quantity of the pudding.
    Is the pudding too thin or is there too much of it compared to the amount of rice.
     

    hectacon

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    I know what kheer is. It's a pudding with rice and is not at all like oatmeal. Now we need to discuss the consistency of the pudding and quantity of the pudding.
    Is the pudding too thin or is there too much of it compared to the amount of rice.


    just like this or may be slightly thinner than this. If it is much more thinner than this?
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    There are many fine Indian establishments in the Bay Area, but oatmeal has not been one of the things I've encountered in Indian cuisine. In my experience with oatmeal, we'd say "watery" or "too much liquid". "Runny" also works.
     

    Truffula

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    I would recommend "thin" as Myridon suggested - that is the term that seems most widely and generally applicable to me. Opposite that, the pudding or oatmeal can be thick.

    But "thin" does not work with noodles. If you need a word that works with pudding and oatmeal and porridge in general and also noodles, "watery" is your best choice. Because noodles that weren't drained well might be watery and so might oatmeal or pudding. But "thin" is better if you are leaving out the noodles, because someone might take "watery" too literally and not quite understand if you said oatmeal or pudding that had too much milk was "watery" (since it might have no water added at all).

    In summary, "watery" can be used with anything that has too much water, and sometimes with anything that has too much liquid. And "thin" can be used with anything that's supposed to thicken and solidify from a liquid, such as pudding, gravy, sauce, thick soup, oatmeal, grits, polenta, risotto, etc.
     
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