you might will be a teacher

nemo eve walle

Senior Member
chinese
Is there any chance two auxiliary verb be collocated together?
Here is my sentence: You are so knowledgeable, you might will be a teacher.
If might is omitted, ''you will be teacher'' can't convey the meaning of ''probably''.
If will is omitted, ''you might be a teacher'' means like saying you probably and already are a teacher.

PS. I don't know if I have a grammatical mistake in my sentences, in the first sentence is it ''be collocated'' or ''are collocated''? Is ''be collocated'' correct?
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    In your first sentence, I think you mean, "You are so knowledgeable, you might well be a teacher." Perhaps you're writing this from something you heard, or possibly misheard.
     

    nemo eve walle

    Senior Member
    chinese
    If two auxiliary verb is together in a sentence, is it a grammatical mistake?
    If it is not, then in what context can it be used?
     

    nemo eve walle

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Is there any special context that two modal auxiliary verbs can be together (I mean be collocated together) in a sentence?
     
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