(?) You mustn’t seriously take what he said.

< Previous | Next >

8769

Senior Member
Japanese and Japan
I understand #1 and #3 are natural English. How about #2 and #4? Are they also natural English?

(a)
1. You mustn’t take seriously what he said.
2. You mustn’t seriously take what he said.

(b)
3. I get up early every day, which requires effort at first.
4. I get up early every day, which needs effort at first.
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Hello, 8769.
    #1 is natural-ish. I personally (and I imagine most other native speakers) would place seriously at the end of the sentence.
    #2 doesn't make much sense, feels like an incomplete sentence.
    #3 grammatically fine, natural-ish, but I'm not entirely sure what you mean.
    #4 pretty much the same as #3, except that require goes better with effort than need does.
     

    Rana_pipiens

    Senior Member
    USA / English
    1. You mustn’t take seriously what he said.
    2. You mustn’t seriously take what he said.
    Frequently adverbs modifying a sentence verb can be shifted around in the sentence (for instance, "- He - walked - across the ice -," where "cautiously" can be inserted at the position of any of the hyphens).

    That isn't true with the idiom, describing a reaction, "take (direct object) (adverb)." The adverb has to follow the direct object. A native speaker would still know what you meant if you said (1), but (2) is garbled.

    3. I get up early every day, which requires effort at first.
    4. I get up early every day, which needs effort at first.
    Requires is okay. Needs sounds funny. I'd use the verb takes. Every single morning is a struggle? If instead the intended meaning is that establishing the habit was difficult, then the verb should be in the past tense, required or took, and the indirect article an before effort: took an effort.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top