you or I

devour

Banned
HINDI
My friend asked me to give money as a loan to him. I told other friend about this and he said, 'he is asking for money tell him that I dont have that'.
Which is better to use I/you?
 
  • ardvark

    Member
    U.S. English
    Your question is somewhat unclear.

    If your friend says "He is asking for money. Tell him that I don't have it." - that means that your friend thinks he is being asked for money and that he does not possess the money.

    If your friend says "He is asking for money. Tell him that you don't have it." - that means that your friend knows that you don't possess the money in order to loan it.

    If you want to tell your other friend that you do not have this money that you would say (to your other friend) "He is asking for money. [I plan on telling him] I don't have it."

    Hope this clarified your confusion!
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    My friend asked me to give money as a loan to him. I told another friend about this and he said, 'He is asking for money tell him that I don't have that.' Which is better to use I/you?
    I'm a bit confused. Someone asked you for a loan, and you told a second friend about it. The second friend said, "Tell him that I don't have it." But the second friend wasn't asked for any money. Please explain.
     

    devour

    Banned
    HINDI
    Teresa:James today asked me to lend him some money.
    William: Tell him that you/I do not have money.
    I hope now you people get it.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hello devour: yes, I think I get it;).

    Your friend said "Tell him that I don't have it".

    That was wrong:(.

    Your friend should have said either:
    Tell him that you don't have it.
    or
    Tell him "I don't have it".
    :)
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Assuming that Loob's interpretation is correct:

    In AE, we'd say, "Tell him you don't have any."
    Or: "Tell him, 'I don't have any'."
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    I'm pretty sure Loob's interpretation is the right one, and I agree with the two possibilities in writing.

    But I wouldn't recommend the second one when speaking, because you can't see the punctuation — so it could be taken as "Tell him I don't have it".
    The version with "that" removes any ambiguity: "Tell him that you don't have it".

    As for "it" vs "any":
    - If the request were "Lend me some money", and I have none, I'd reply "I don't have any".
    - If I were asked to lend £100, I might well reply "I don't have it", (though I might have £50).

    Ws:)
     

    devour

    Banned
    HINDI
    Thanks. So if that and which come we'll use 'I' because of indirect speech.
    Jame needs money which I
    don't have.
    Am i right?
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    It depends on who is speaking, devour.

    In the situation you described, if you are speaking, you say "James needs money which (or that) I don't have".

    If it's your friend William speaking, he says "James needs money which (or that) you don't have".

    Ws:)
     
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