You play very good team handball

  • Dalian

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    I'm not sure how to translate your sentence into Korean, but I do know the correct Korean expression for 'thank you' is 'kam sa hap ni da.':)
     

    Lems

    Senior Member
    Brazil - Brazilian Portuguese
    Whodunit, the translator Wordlingo shows: Inside neng shovel B it peels...

    Whatever that means...
     

    hye young

    Member
    Korean Korea
    whodunit said:
    안넝닁삽나까

    Is there anyone who has Korean knowledge and can translate a brief sentence?

    Kamsa njida. (Hope it’s correct → as "Thank you")

    My sentence reads: "You play very good team handball".
    Let me help you whodunit. :)
    First, it's "안녕하십니까?" or "안녕하세요?"

    If you want to say something like "You are good at (playing) handball.",
    you can say "handball ( 핸드볼 ) 정말 잘 하시는 군요." or "핸드볼 잘 하시네요."
    in Roman characters : "handball jungmal jal hasineun gunyo." or "handball jal hasineyo."

    jungmal - really, truly
    jal - very well
    play- origianl verb form : 'hada', 'hada' is almost like 'do' in English.
    'hada' is changing its form in these sentences : 'hasineun gunyo' and 'hasineyo'

    I hope this is what you wanted. :)
     

    Dalian

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    hi hye young,

    i got one question: i know that 시 shows an honorific sense in Korean, what does the following part mean? i.e. 는 군요 and 네요? are they just inflectional affixes for exclamation? and what's their difference?
     

    hye young

    Member
    Korean Korea
    Dalian said:
    hi hye young,

    i got one question: i know that 시 shows an honorific sense in Korean, what does the following part mean? i.e. 는 군요 and 네요? are they just inflectional affixes for exclamation? and what's their difference?
    Hello, Dalian.

    You explained them all. :) You're better than me explaining grammars.

    And I'd say that ...네요 is more common in everyday conversation.

    For example, "피곤해 보이시네요" meaning "You look tired". There's no question mark. You can also express it in a declarative form : "너 피곤해 보인다"

    너 - you (between friends)
    피곤한 - tired
    보이다 - look
     

    Dalian

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    thank you for your answer, hye young.
    for the "you look tired' sentence, can I omit the 시, and only say it as:피곤해 보이네요 to close friends?
     

    hye young

    Member
    Korean Korea
    Yes, there's no .... in "피곤해 보이네요" because we use '시' when you should use terms of respect to someone you are talking or referring to in conversation. But '보이다' is not an active verb, meaning you don't actually move your body or something, you just see with your open eyes. And you don't use honorific words to yourself as you might know very well. But even some Korean people make mistakes when they write or speak. But we need to be more accurate.

    Another example here in "운동을 잘 하시네요", you can put '시' because the subject is a person who is playing exercise and it's not you but the person you're referring to.

    hm..I'm confusing myself too.
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Hi hye young,

    first of all, thank you very much. Is the pronunciation of these words the same as written below or can I shorten it because of slang? And what about the pronunciation of “handball”? More like English [hændbo:l] or French [ãdbal] or German [handbal]?

    And as far as I understood the “hello” in Korean, it’s “An jong ha shi ni ka” and that reads in characters (is it an insult?) 안녕삽나까?, doesn’t it? Does the question says the same as “How are you?”?
    Sorry for my ignorance in Korean.
     

    hye young

    Member
    Korean Korea
    whodunit said:
    Hi hye young,

    first of all, thank you very much. Is the pronunciation of these words the same as written below or can I shorten it because of slang? And what about the pronunciation of “handball”? More like English [hændbo:l] or French [ãdbal] or German [handbal]?

    And as far as I understood the “hello” in Korean, it’s “An jong ha shi ni ka” and that reads in characters (is it an insult?) 안녕삽나까?, doesn’t it? Does the question says the same as “How are you?”?
    Sorry for my ignorance in Korean.
    Hi, whodunit!

    There's no word like '안녕닁삽나까'. It's 'anyounghasimnika:안녕하십니까' or 'anyounghaseyo:안녕하세요'.

    I made a very simple dialog for you ;)

    hye young: 안녕하세요?
    whodunit: 네, 안녕하세요?

    안녕( 安寧 ) has the meaning of peace, tranquility, good health and the like. So literal translation in English, it'd be 'are you in good health' or 'is everything all right with you'. Then you answer '네(yes)' omitting '안녕합니다(i'm fine)' because it sounds really odd. And you also ask about how the other person is '안녕하세요'. And then lead the conversation with other issues. :)

    And the pronunciation of 'handball' is just 'handball' as you pronounce it in English. Or you can spell it in Korean : 핸드볼 and says it 'hendbol'.

    You can make errors and learn from them. I think it's the best way to improve your language skill. :)
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    So, thanks again.

    I added the piece where I read the "wrong" greeting as attachment below.

    May I ask you how to pronounce "yes"; isn't it something like "ne"? And the negative (to say "no") is pronounced "anyoung"? If so, I wouldn't understand the greeting and the saying-goodbye that begin with "anyoung...". "Bye" means "anyounghikeshiwsjo".

    I really don't even know the Korean script and its Roman transcriptions. So I'm very sorry.
     

    hye young

    Member
    Korean Korea
    No need to be sorry whodunit. ;);)

    네-nae
    아니오-anio or 아니요-aniyo
    The second one is more common in speaking.

    Now you'll not confuse with the word '안녕-anyoung' ( hello, goodbye btw friends, the same age with you or younger ones ).
    '안녕히계세요-anyounghi gaeseyo' when you say goodbye to older people.

    I think you're a very diligent student. I'll wait for new questions from you.
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Diligent is a good word, but I wouldn't use it as far as school goes. :)

    But "ae" in the word "nae" is pronounced as ae in English "Yeah", right?

    What do you think about the attachment I sent to prove the misleading with reference to the "wrong" greeting. I read it in a very serious encyclopaedia in my computer.

    And now, I think, I want to have translated the last phrase into Korean: "Do you really know Korean?"
     

    hye young

    Member
    Korean Korea
    oops :p

    'nae' sounds similar to 'yeah' more or less.
    And the attachment? It is a perfect Korean! Did you save some image somewhere? But your computer encyclopedia is wrong this time. We don't make this strange form '닁' with the Hanguel consonants and vowels.

    Your last request this time goes like this :
    "hangookuh ahseyo?"
    "한국어 아세요?"

    한국어-Korean language

    if you want to say "do you speak Korean" too,
    "hangookmal haljool ahseyo?"
    "한국말 할줄 아세요?"
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Since I'm learning Arabic - only 100 different characters and a bit - I tried to type in words in Arabic over and over again. But I still doubt Korean keyboards:

    If I switch my keyboard into a Korean one, it doesn't write as a Korean one, but as an US English one. So I have to search the Korean letters, characters, whatever, in a list with Hangu(e)ls from Hangul Ga ( 가 ) to Hangul Ha ( 하 ). (correct me please)

    Why are you able to type in the Korean scipt?

    You said my attachment is perfect Korean? I thought it's wrong. And what about the Korean handwriting? I read you arrange the script like clusters? Unlike in here in lines. Is it right? What ciphers do you use?
     

    hye young

    Member
    Korean Korea
    whodunit said:
    Since I'm learning Arabic - only 100 different characters and a bit - I tried to type in words in Arabic over and over again. But I still doubt Korean keyboards:

    If I switch my keyboard into a Korean one, it doesn't write as a Korean one, but as an US English one. So I have to search the Korean letters, characters, whatever, in a list with Hangu(e)ls from Hangul Ga ( 가 ) to Hangul Ha ( 하 ). (correct me please)

    Why are you able to type in the Korean scipt?

    You said my attachment is perfect Korean? I thought it's wrong. And what about the Korean handwriting? I read you arrange the script like clusters? Unlike in here in lines. Is it right? What ciphers do you use?
    in that case, i'll write them all down here.

    vowels: ㄱ ㄴ ㄷ ㄹ ㅁ ㅂ ㅅ ㅇ ㅈ ㅊ ㅋ ㅌ ㅎ
    ㄲ ㄸ ㅃ ㅆ ㅉ
    consonants: ㅏ ㅑ ㅓ ㅕ ㅜ ㅠ ㅗ ㅛ ㅡ ㅣ ㅐ ㅒ ㅔ ㅖ

    가 나 다 라 마 바 사 아 자 차 카 타 파 하
     

    hye young

    Member
    Korean Korea
    i was writing a very long answers for you whodunit but somehow i couldn't submit my reply. it's just gone. :eek:
    i'm a little bit tired to do it all over again. so... i'll see if i can recall them and post it later.

    danke. ;)
     
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