you regain the respect you [had lost / have lost]?

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moldova

Member
Korean_South Korea
"If it is done right, you regain the respect you had lost, and retain a part of your power."

In the relative clause "you had lost", the past perfect is used.

Is the use of the past perfect gramatically correct?

Should it be changed to the present perfect "have lost"?


There is an art to knowing when to retire. If it is done right, you regain the respect you had lost, and retain a part of your power. The greatest ruler of the sixteenth century was Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor. He governed an empire that at one point included much of Europe and the New World. <-----Excess quote removed by moderator (Florentia52)-----> <The 48 Laws Of Power by Robert Greene>
 
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  • I think it's OK as is. "have lost" might be possible.

    Certainly, speaking of Charles, it would be correct to say (past tense), "He regained the respect he had lost, by quitting."

    If it were present advice to you as king, yes, I might say, "By withdrawing now, you regain the respect you have lost." Here I would prefer 'have'.

    NOTE: For present advice, also this works is the 'loss' is not known. "By withdrawing now, you would regain any respect you had lost."
     
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    moldova

    Member
    Korean_South Korea
    Then, would it be more correct to use "have lost" than "had lost" in the given sentence?
    I'm still a little confused.
     
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