You saved/have saved

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Enlighty

Senior Member
Arabic
Present perfect should be used when a past event is connected to the present right? So "You've saved me" should mean THAT YOU ARE NOW saved. Correct? I've heard some sentences where people say "You saved me". Here's some context:

Person 1: I forgot to bring my lunch

Person 2: Here, take mine.

Person 1: You saved me..

Something like that. But why do they use past simple instead of present perfect? Doesn't "You've saved me" mean that the saving started in the past and now it has a result? EX; He can eat now, or something. I'm a bit confused with past simple/present perfect.
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    You could use either "you saved me" or "you've saved me" in that dialogue, but we generally use the simple past because it's shorter.
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Person 1: I forgot to bring my lunch
    Person 2: Here, take mine.

    Person 1: You've saved me.. (British English)

    Person 1: You saved me.. (American English)
     
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