You scrub up well

tetulio5

Senior Member
Spanish-España
Hello,
I have just read the next phrase:

' Hello, Beth. You look a million dollars!'
Thank you. You scrub up well yourself '

' Hola Beth. Vas muy bien vestida!
Gracias. .....'

I don't get any proper sentence for ' you scrub up well yourself'
 
  • Alguienanonimo

    Senior Member
    Spanish Spain Spanish Argentina
    Hello,
    I have just read the next phrase:

    ' Hello, Beth. You look a million dollars!'
    Thank you. You scrub up well yourself '

    ' Hola Beth. Vas muy bien vestida!
    Gracias. .....'

    I don't get any proper sentence for ' you scrub up well yourself'

    Te pusiste presentable
     

    Victoria Izanami

    New Member
    Español
    Hello,
    I have just read the next phrase:

    ' Hello, Beth. You look a million dollars!'
    Thank you. You scrub up well yourself '

    ' Hola Beth. Vas muy bien vestida!
    Gracias. .....'

    I don't get any proper sentence for ' you scrub up well yourself'
    Para mí sería " Te arreglaste muy bien"
     

    SydLexia

    Senior Member
    UK English
    It's probable that they have both got dressed up to go to some sort of event:

    With "You scrub up well yourself" Beth is saying that the other has obviously made an effort and looks good too.

    "Tus esfuerzos han dado resultado tambien"

    syd
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    Hello, Beth. You look a million dollars!
    Thank you. You scrub up well yourself.

    In my English the more common version is "you clean up well," but the meaning is the same. In my opinion, it is a subtle joke, implying that the other person usually dresses very casually, doesn't fix up their hair, etc. It's sort of like saying, "Wow, when you put on some nice clothes and fix yourself up, you don't look too bad!" The image I get of the literal meaning is of a person who is disheveled, maybe covered in dirt, and then, after taking a bath, looks much more presentable.
     

    Galván

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Lo entiendo como una broma ya que "scrub-up" es literalmente pasarse la esponja en la bañera, lo cual supone un esfuerzo mínimo en comparación con el esfuerzo que hizo Beth en arreglarse.
     

    grindios

    Senior Member
    USA
    English - United States Midwestern
    In my English the more common version is "you clean up well," but the meaning is the same. In my opinion, it is a subtle joke, implying that the other person usually dresses very casually, doesn't fix up their hair, etc. It's sort of like saying, "Wow, when you put on some nice clothes and fix yourself up, you don't look too bad!" The image I get of the literal meaning is of a person who is disheveled, maybe covered in dirt, and then, after taking a bath, looks much more presentable.
    100% de acuerdo, por lo menos en los EEUU
     

    SydLexia

    Senior Member
    UK English
    100% de acuerdo, por lo menos en los EEUU

    I also agree with gengo: that's exactly what it means in BrE as well.

    And "scrubbing" requires effort of a fairly vigorous kind. It's how housemaids used to clean the floor; on their knees with a scrubbing brush (and that is, in fact, part of the joke).

    syd
     

    grindios

    Senior Member
    USA
    English - United States Midwestern
    And "scrubbing" requires effort of a fairly vigorous kind. It's how housemaids used to clean the floor; on their knees with a scrubbing brush (and that is, in fact, part of the joke).
    Not in the US. Here it means exactly what gengo said with the amount of effort (no matter how little or great) not being implied.
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    And "scrubbing" requires effort of a fairly vigorous kind. It's how housemaids used to clean the floor; on their knees with a scrubbing brush (and that is, in fact, part of the joke).

    I think "scrub" is used more frequently in BrEn than in AmEn, that is, in meanings other than the literal one involving a scrubbing brush. On British TV car shows I often hear this used. For example, a guy buying a used car that is covered in dust might say, "It needs a bit of a scrub-up, but other than that it looks good." The car does not need to be scrubbed, and merely needs to be washed. I've also heard people use it to refer to taking a quick shower, etc., in which no literal scrubbing is involved.

    All that aside, the original version in this thread (with scrub) would be readily understood by all Americans, and some may even say it that way.
     
    Top