You should have taken the medicine

dec-sev

Senior Member
Russian
Hello, Abba. Moderator note: The following text refers to this post.
If my mother tongue were either English or German I would be sure at least of what one of them is concerned :) I had to consult my English textbook. According to it "You should have taken the medicine" = "You ought to have taken the medicine". This means that the person in question didn't take the medicine. Do I understand you right that both phrases can be translated into German as "Do solltest die Arznei eingenommen haben"?
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • Hello, Abba.
    If my mother tongue were either English or German I would be sure at least of what one of them is concerned :) I had to consult my English textbook. According to it "You should have taken the medicine" = "You ought to have taken the medicine". This means that the person in question didn't take the medicine. Do I understand you right that both phrases can be translated into German as "Do solltest die Arznei eingenommen haben"?
    No dec-sev,
    this is definitely "Du hättest die Medizin einnehmen sollen/müssen" (the person didn't take the medicine).
    "Du solltest die Arznei eingenommen haben" is an advice for the future, i.e. "Du solltest die Arznei bis spätestens morgen um 19.00 Uhr eingenommen haben".
     

    dec-sev

    Senior Member
    Russian
    But ABBA agreed with this:
    The car should have been built. Das Auto sollte gebaut worden sein.:tick:
    The only difference between my example and this one is that my example is in the active voice while this one is in the passive. Oder gibt es irgendeinen Unterschied noch, den ich nicht sehe?
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    No dec-sev,
    this is definitely "Du hättest die Medizin einnehmen sollen/müssen" (the person didn't take the medicine).
    "Du solltest die Arznei eingenommen haben" is an advice for the future, i.e. "Du solltest die Arznei bis spätestens morgen um 19.00 Uhr eingenommen haben".
    Hi, this is definitely context sensitive. It also is valid for the past.

    To make it clear, there sould be a hint like:

    Du solltest eigentlich die Medizin schon eingenommen haben.
    Du solltest die Medizin doch gestern schon eingenommen haben.

    Here I suppose "you" didn't take it, and I criticize it, or I indicate an indirect question: "Did you take it?".

    In other context it is different:

    Er sollte die Medizin eigentlich gestern eingenommen haben.
    Here I suppose, he did take it, but I am not sure.

    "Du solltest die Arznei bis spätestens morgen um 19.00 Uhr eingenommen haben".
    This is an advice for the future, of course.
     

    dec-sev

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Du solltest eigentlich die Medizin schon eingenommen haben.
    Du solltest die Medizin doch gestern schon eingenommen haben.

    Here I suppose "you" didn't take it, and I criticize it, or I indicate an indirect question: "Did you take it?".
    Verstehe ich dich richtig, dass die Konstruktion "sollte /solltest, etc + perfektes Invinitiv" dasselbe wie "hätte + Infinitiv + sollen" bedeuten kann? Mit anderen Worten:
    Du solltest eigentlich die Medizin schon eingenommen haben = Du hättest die Medizin einnemen sollen.
    Das letztere würde ich benutzen, wenn "I suppose "you" didn't take it, and I criticize it"
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Bei "eigentlich" ist es möglich, aber nicht deutlich. Es kann aber sein. Der Satz ist nicht eindeutig.

    Bessere Übereinstimmung herrscht in:

    Du solltest eigentlich die Medizin schon eingenommen haben = Du hättest die Medizin eigentlich schon einnehmen sollen. (möglich, beides kann sowohl Vermutung ausdrücken, als auch Enttäuschung)

    Es sind unterschiedliche Betrachtungsweisen des gleichen Sachverhaltes.

    Der Satz kann unterschiedliche Bedeutung haben, abhängig vom Kontext.
    ---
    Du solltest die Medizin eingenommen haben.
    Hier kann es eine Vermutung sein, eventuell eine indirekte Frage: Ich denke, du hast die Medizin eingenommen, stimmt das?


    Du hättest die Medizin einnehmen sollen.
    Hier ist es praktisch immer ein Auftrag, der nicht erfüllt wurde. Es wäre besser, hättest du sie eingenommen.

    Letztlich ist es aber vom Kontext abhängig.
     
    Last edited:

    dec-sev

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Letztlich ist es aber vom Kontext abhängig.
    Das ist der Kontext:
    Sowka hat den Thread gesplittert und benannte den neuen Thead "You should have taken the medicie". Die Bedeutung der Phrase auf Englisch ist mir bekannt und ich weiß - zumindest so glaube ich - wie man die Konstruktion "should + perfect infinitiv" im Englischen benutz. Nach dem Beitrag von Bahiano auf diesem Thread entstand mir ein Zweifel bezüglich der Konstuktion "sollen + perfektes Infinitiv", und ich sage zu Sowka (das ist nur der Kontext):

    You should have titled the thread "Du solltest die Arznei eingenommen haben" rather than "You should have taken the medicine". (She didn't give the tread the title I would have given)

    Diesen Satz würde ich so übersetzen:
    Du hättest den Thread statt "You should have taken the medicine", "Du solltest die Arznei eingenommen haben" benennen sollen.

    Falls ich dich richtig verstanden haben, wenn ich in "Do solltest den Thread XXXX benennen haben" "eigentlcih" und "schon" einsetze (Du solltest eigentlich den Thread XXXXX schon benennen haben"), wird dieser neue Satz eindeutig Dasselbe bedeuten, wie "You should have titled the tread XXXXX" = "Du hättest den Thread XXXX benennen sollen". Ohne "schon" und "eigentlich" kann der Sazt Dasselbe bedeuten, aber er ist nicht eindeutig. Habe ich dich richtig verstanden?
     
    Last edited:

    ABBA Stanza

    Senior Member
    English (UK)
    Diesen Satz würde ich so übersetzen:
    Du hättest den Thread statt "You should have taken the medicine", "Du solltest die Arznei eingenommen haben" benennen sollen.
    That's correct in this specific context. However please note that both

    (a) "Du solltest die Medizin eingenommen haben"

    and

    (b) "Du hättest die Medizin einnehmen sollen"

    translate to the same English phrase, namely: "You should have taken the medicine".

    I think part of the confusion is due to the fact that some posts have been concentrating on just the second translation, although in the absence of context both translations are possible, as originally pointed out by Bahiano.

    In English, which interpretation ((a) or (b)) is intended can only be determined by examining the context.

    In German, whether (a) or (b) is used depends on what you want to say. For example, if you simply want to point out an obligation another person had to do something in the past, without saying anything about whether that person did or did not fulfill that obligation (maybe you don't even know that information), then (a) would be appropriate.

    However, if you want to point out that an option you know the other person did not take would have been better, then you would use (b). In this case, discussing the other past option(s) is purely hypothetical (the other person cannot turn back time and take the other option!). This "hypotheticality" (or should it be "hypotheticalness"? :)) explains why the "hätte .... <verb. inf.> sollen" form is used in German in such cases. English, however, does not make such a distinction.

    That's it for now. Hopefully, I haven't added to the confusion even more. :)

    Cheers,
    Abba
     

    dec-sev

    Senior Member
    Russian
    That's it for now. Hopefully, I haven't added to the confusion even more. :)
    On the contrary. Now everything seems to be more or less clear to me.
    However please note that both

    (a) "Du solltest die Medizin eingenommen haben"

    and

    (b) "Du hättest die Medizin einnehmen sollen"

    translate to the same English phrase, namely: "You should have taken the medicine".
    I didn't know that. I've only come across "sollen + perfektes Infinitiv" meaning "it's said" or "it's believed". For example:
    Drie Menschen sollen biem Unglück ums Leben gekommen sein.
    I would translate it into English as
    Three people are reported to have died in the accicent.
    And as far as "should + perfect infinitiv" in English is concered I've only come across this construction meaning that something that's believed had better to be done actually has not been done. Like in my example with the thread titling.
    After recieving Hutschi's post I spent half an hour googling for sollte + various combinations of the perfect infinitiv but I failed to find any example of "sollen + perf. inf." meaning an obligation to to something in the past. All the examples are about "It's said" or "It's believed":

    Wehrturm soll 1190 gebaut worden sein
    quelle

    Ein Rathaus soll um
    1400 erbaut worden sein.
    quelle

    Hallo, Beispiel, jemand soll einen Brief absenden, und ich werde gefragt ob der Brief bereits gesendet ist, und meine Antwort ist dann: Ich weiß es nicht genau,

    "der Brief sollte bereits abgesendet worden sein"
    1) La carta debería haber sido enviada/mandada.
    2) La carta habría debido ser enviada/mandada.

    quelle

    I would translate the last sentence as "must have been sent" which is more or less the same as "I think that somebody has sent it"

    So my question: is "sollen + perfektes Invinitiv" used ofen meaning an obligation to do something in the past or not?

    For example, if you simply want to point out an obligation another person had to do something in the past, without saying anything about whether that person did or did not fulfill that obligation (maybe you don't even know that information), then (a) would be appropriate.
    Can I in this case simply say: "Du solltest die Medizin einnemen"? I mean without using perfect invinitiv.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    "Du solltest die Medizin einnehmen" Has two meanings:
    1. Indikativ/Indicative: You were supposed to take the medicine.
    2. Konjunktiv/Conjunctive or subjunctive(?): It is recommended that you take the medicine; you should take it.

    Context is required to decide it.


    The examples we discussed above are interesting examples for "gestalt shift". Because the meanings are overlapping, and each of the sentences has additional meanings, it is difficult to explain, especially in English. I think we learned a lot about the differences and coincidences of the two languages.

    However, I think it is possible to express the sentence both in English and in German, what is said in German, if not - it were an example of the Whorfian principle of language relativity.
     
    Last edited:

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    This sentence would not refer to the past and simply is equivalent to
    "You should take the medicine."
    I am very sure that the meaning of the sentence "Du solltest die Medizin einnehmen." depends on the context.
    But for you the past tense seems to be blocked. Is this a regional property or why is it blocked, if you do not have context?

    Here is a very easy example:

    Du solltest die Medizin einnehmen. Hast du sie genommen?

    Du solltest die Medizin einnehmen. Wirst du der Empfehlung folgen?
     

    Resa Reader

    Senior Member
    I am very sure that the meaning of the sentence "Du solltest die Medizin einnehmen." depends on the context.
    But for you the past tense seems to be blocked. Is this a regional property or why is it blocked, if you do not have context?

    Here is a very easy example:

    Du solltest die Medizin einnehmen. Hast du sie genommen?

    Du solltest die Medizin einnehmen. Wirst du der Empfehlung folgen?
    I edited my answer as soon as I had seen your reply, Hutschi, but somehow this doesn't seem to have worked.
    When I first read the German sentence I only thought of it as a recommendation. Only when I saw your reply did it occur to me that there is also this second meaning (Indicative: Du solltest die Medizin also gestern einnehmen.) - and I said so. :)
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    I edited my answer as soon as I had seen your reply, Hutschi, but somehow this doesn't seem to have worked.
    When I first read the German sentence I only thought of it as a recommendation. Only when I saw your reply did it occur to me that there is also this second meaning (Indicative: Du solltest die Medizin also gestern einnehmen.) - and I said so. :)
    This is typical for "gestalt shift".

    Here there is an essay, showing the principle also with pictures. http://www.roangelo.net/logwitt/gestalt-shift.html

    I am working at the area of technical communication as technical writer - and it is very difficult to avoid such things in the texts.
     

    dec-sev

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I edited my answer as soon as I had seen your reply, Hutschi, but somehow this doesn't seem to have worked.
    When I first read the German sentence I only thought of it as a recommendation. Only when I saw your reply did it occur to me that there is also this second meaning (Indicative: Du solltest die Medizin also gestern einnehmen.) - and I said so. :)
    Verstehe ich dich richtig, dass "Du solltest die Medizin also (gestern) einnehmen." und ""Du solltest die Medizin eingenommen haben" im Prinzip Dasselbe bedeuten, nämlich was ABBA gesagt hat "an obligation another person had to do something in the past"?
     

    Gernot Back

    Senior Member
    German - Germany
    Verstehe ich dich richtig, dass "Du solltest die Medizin also (gestern) einnehmen." und ""Du solltest die Medizin eingenommen haben" im Prinzip Dasselbe bedeuten, nämlich was ABBA gesagt hat "an obligation another person had to do something in the past"?
    Nein und ob du gestern sagst oder nicht, kann dabei auch einen großen Unterschied bedeuten:
    Der Arzt hat gesagt, du sollst die Medizin nur alle zwei Tage nehmen.
    Du solltest die Medizin also gestern einnehmen,
    wenn du sie vorgestern nicht genommen hast.

    -> Das ist die Feststellung einer Tatsache und deshalb steht der Satz auch im Indikativ des Präteritums (Imperfekts).

    Der Arzt hat gesagt, du sollst die Medizin nur alle zwei Tage nehmen.
    Du solltest die Medizin also einnehmen,
    wenn du sie gestern nicht genommen hast.

    -> Das ist eine Empfehlung und deshalb steht der Satz in der Höflichkeitsform (Konjunktiv 2 der Gegenwart).

    Du solltest die Medizin eingenommen haben.
    -> Das ist eine Vermutung, die sich auf die Vergangenheit bezieht. Das Modalverb wird hier im subjektiven Gebrauch verwendet: Die Bedeutung ist etwa die gleiche wie im Satz:
    Es gibt einige gegenwärtige Indizien, die dafür sprechen, dass du die Medizin eingenommen hast!
    Du hättest die Medizin (gestern) einnehmen sollen.
    -> Das ist entweder Irrealis; der Satz bedeutet dann so viel wie:
    Du hast (gestern) die Medizin nicht wie vorgesehen eingenommen.
    -> oder es ist eine Meinungsäüßerung, dann bedeutet der Satz so viel wie:
    Es wäre besser gewesen, wenn du die Medizin gestern (statt heute) eingenommen hättest
    oder
    ...
    eingenommen hättest(, anstatt sie die Toilette hinunterzuspülen).
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    ...

    Du solltest die Medizin eingenommen haben.
    -> Das ist eine Vermutung, die sich auf die Vergangenheit bezieht. ...
    Oder es ist Indikativ. Das hängt vom Kontext ab. Ich stimme aber zu, dass es meist eine Vermutung ist. Außerdem kann es ein Erfordernis sein, diese Möglichkeit hatte ich vergessen.

    Bedingung, Möglichkeit: Du solltest die Medizin eingenommen haben. Hast du sie nicht eingenommen, kann es schlimm enden.

    Indikativ: Du solltest die Medizin eingenommen haben. Warum hast du sie nicht eingenommen??

    Vermutung: Bist du nicht sicher, ob du die Medizin eingenommen hast? Du solltest die Medizin eingenommen haben. Dort steht nämlich die leere Schachtel.
     

    Gernot Back

    Senior Member
    German - Germany
    Indikativ: Du solltest die Medizin eingenommen haben. Warum hast du sie nicht eingenommen??
    Nein, das würde ich niemals so sagen. Bei mir würde es in dieser Bedeutung immer heißen:
    Du hättest die Medizin einnehmen sollen.
    (Warum hast du sie nicht eingenommen?)

    In manchen Dialekten, unter anderem auch hier im Rheinischen und im Westfälischen ist es allerdings sehr üblich, den Indikativ von Modalverben auch als Ausdruck des Irrealis zu missbrauchen. Ich halte dies standardsprachlich aber schlichtweg für falsch. Standardsprachlich wird strikt unterschieden zwischen dem objektiven Gebrauch des Modalverbs:
    Du hättest die Medizin einnehmen sollen.
    (Dein Arzt hat dich angewiesen sie einzunehmen, das hast du aber leider nicht gemacht.)
    ... und seinem subjektiven Gebrauch:
    Du solltest die Medizin eingenommen haben.
    (Alle Anzeichen deuten für mich darauf hin, dass du sie tatsächlich eingenommen hast)
    Über dieses Thema habe ich vor einigen Jahren schon in einem anderen Deutsch-Forum eine längere Debatte geführt, der -so glaube ich- am Schluss keiner mehr folgen konnte:
    vgl.: "Ich wollte ihn noch angerufen haben" statt "Ich hätte ihn noch anrufen wollen".
    http://www.wer-weiss-was.de/theme143/article4448641.html
     

    dec-sev

    Senior Member
    Russian

    Du solltest die Medizin eingenommen haben.
    -> Das ist eine Vermutung, die sich auf die Vergangenheit bezieht. Das Modalverb wird hier im subjektiven Gebrauch verwendet: Die Bedeutung ist etwa die gleiche wie im Satz:
    Es gibt einige gegenwärtige Indizien, die dafür sprechen, dass du die Medizin eingenommen hast!
    Ich verstehe ich auch so, und die Beispiele, die ich in Post No11 eingeführt hat, bedeuten Dasselbe:
    Es gibt einige Indizien, die dafür sprechen, dass das Rathaus 1400 erbaut wurde und dass der Brief gestern abgesendet wurde.
    Aber Hutschi sagt:
    Indikativ: Du solltest die Medizin eingenommen haben. Warum hast du sie nicht eingenommen??
    Wenn man diese Phrase sagt, muss er sicher sein, dass die Person, mit der er srpicht, die Medizin nicht eingenommen hat. Oder?
    Wenn ich die Poste richtig verstehe, benutzt Gernot die Konstruktion "sollen + perfektes Infinitiv" nur für eine Vermutung (Es gibt einige gegenwärtige Indizien, die dafür sprechen, dass...) wogegen, ABBA und Hutschi behaupten, man könne die Konstruktion auch für eine Olbigation im Zusammenghang mit der Vergangenheit benutzen. Und im Beispiel von Hutschi steht es fest, dass die Person diese Obligation nicht ausgeführt hat.
    Stimmt es?
    Noch was:
    Peter arbeitet als Inspektor. Ihm wurde beauftragt am Montag zu eine Filiale der Firma zu fahren und eiene Ispektion dort durchzuführen. Aber er ist nicht gekommen. Sein Chef telefoniert mit ihm und sagt: "You had to inspect the the branch office XXXX yesterday. Why didn't you do it?"
    Kann man diese Phrase mit "sollen" übersetzen?

     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Und im Beispiel von Hutschi steht es fest, dass die Person diese Obligation nicht ausgeführt hat.
    Stimmt es?


    Ja, das stimmt.

    Du solltest die Medizin eingenommen haben. Warum hast du sie nicht eingenommen?
    Eine andere Frage ist, dass man hier auch sagen kann:
    Du solltest die Medizin einnehmen. Warum hast du sie nicht eingenommen?

    Stilistisch ist das besser (in diesem Kontext).
    "Haben" sagt, dass Du das Einnehmen beendet haben solltest. Es ist aber durch den restlichen Kontext redundant, wenn man es nicht besonders betonen will.
    Wenn man es betonen will, kann man zusätzliche Hinweise einfügen:
    Du solltest die Medizin bereits eingenommen haben. Warum hast du sie nicht eingenommen?
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top