you shouldn’t take a lower-paying job just to get work

mimi2

Senior Member
vietnam vietnamese
Hi,
Is this sentence correct?
“If you are lay off, you shouldn’t take a lower-paying job just to get work.”
I think the sentence also makes sense without the last part. But this sentence was not written by me so I think the writer has his own purpose I don’t know. Could you help me?
Thanks.
 
  • loricat

    Member
    Canada, English
    “If you are laid off, you shouldn’t take a lower-paying job just to get work.”

    "If you are laid off, you shouldn't take a lower-paying job" is a correct, complete sentence, but it means "look for work that pays the same as you had before, not less"

    The original sentence, with the "just to get work" part, is a different advice altogether -- it means (if I were writing it to a friend :)) "Don't panic and take the first low paying job you find just because you're worried about not having work!"


     

    Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    Hi Mimi,

    The sentence is grammatically incorrect. It should read, "“If you are laid off, you shouldn’t take a lower-paying job just to get work.” The underlined part is correct.
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    Hi Mimi,

    The sentence is grammatically incorrect. It should read, "“If you are laid off, you shouldn’t take a lower-paying job just to get work.” The underlined part is correct.
    Hi, Joelline. :)
    I hope you are fine.
    "lay off" is also a noun. If I use it as a noun, how can I do?
    Thanks.
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    “If you are laid off, you shouldn’t take a lower-paying job just to get work.”

    "If you are laid off, you shouldn't take a lower-paying job" is a correct, complete sentence, but it means "look for work that pays the same as you had before, not less"

    The original sentence, with the "just to get work" part, is a different advice altogether -- it means (if I were writing it to a friend :)) "Don't panic and take the first low paying job you find just because you're worried about not having work!"
    Hi, loricat.
    Thank you very much for your explanation.
    Now the sentence is not hard for me to understand any more.
    It is easy now. Thanks. :) :)
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    Because of the decline in business, we expect that there will be a layoff of workers.

    Many employees lost their jobs during the layoffs that came after the businesses merged.
    Thank you, GreenWhiteBlue, for your correction and your examples. :)
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Mimi,

    I hope your books are clear about the difference between the two verbs to lay and to lie. Many English-speaking people muddle them. The fact that they use the same forms in places causes problems for many.

    Lay, laid, laid. - to put down, to place (transitive)
    Lie, lay, lain. - to be prostrate, or to assume a reclining position (intransitive)

    Needless to say they both form phrasal verbs by adding prepositions (to lay over, to lay off) (to lie down, to lie in) which have many different meanings.

    To lay off means to put to one side or to dismiss, which is why the correct form of your sentence is if you are laid off, as people have pointed out.
     

    nh01

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    just to get work.” The underlined part is correct.

    Does "get work" here simply mean "to start to work"? For example, if there are better candidates for the job than you, can we say "It will be hard for you to get this work"? Thanks.
     
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