You think Julie a good wife and a great mother.

Lydia Qiu

Senior Member
Mandarin
Hi all, I read a sentence by my friend, I'm not sure whether it's grammatically correct. Can you help me with it?

"You think Julie a good wife and a great mother. But actually she's not."

Is "think someone something" correct?
 
  • Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    Hello LQ, yes, "think someone something" is ok.
    think (...)
    8. to consider a person or thing as indicated:
    [~ + adjective + of + object] I only think well of her.
    [~ + object + adjective] He thought me unkind.
    [~ + object + noun] She thought him a total fool. (WR)
    It tends to be used in quite formal style, so writing rather than conversational speech, but it's ok in speech too.
     
    Last edited:

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    With the possible exception of "think well/badly of someone", I don't think I use it in everyday speech. It sounds a little stiff or formal to me.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Until the 1960s, this was the normal construction, and even now it's occasionally heard in very brief utterances like "You may think me stupid". But far more usual today is "You may think I'm stupid" (see Google Ngram Viewer and click on the blue square to reveal). Likewise, the normal version of your #1 sentence today would be "You think Julie's a good wife and a great mother. But actually she's not."
     
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