You think your [feces] don't stink, but your [flatulence] gives you away.

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tezza417

Member
USA - Inglese
I have edited this phrase that my dad, age 78, says that his Aunt Joan used on occaision, long ago.

He can't quite remember the italian version (that's the language she used for the phrase), but it has something to do with:

You think your [feces] doesn't stink, but your [flatulence] gives you away.

Is anyone else familiar with such a saying?
 
  • Gwennhadu

    Senior Member
    o
    Hockey13 is great :D
    We don't have a saying, no...
    An attempt at translation...
    Pensi che la tua cacca non puzzi, ma ti tradisce il vento delle tue scorreggie...
    It's just one of many possible versions..I had fun...omg...
     

    tezza417

    Member
    USA - Inglese
    Hockey13 is great :D
    We don't have a saying, no...
    An attempt at translation...
    Pensi che la tua cacca non puzzi, ma ti tradisce il vento delle tue scorreggie...
    It's just one of many possible versions..I had fun...omg...
    How about this:

    Pensi che la tua merda :warn: non puzza, ma le tue scoregge ti tradiscono.
    ??
     

    shirvanshir83

    New Member
    Italy/Italian
    "Pensi che la tua :warn: merda non puzzi, ma le tue scoregge ti tradiscono" is correct!
    "Pensi" is the 2nd person indicative present of "Pensare", as Lsp said. In this case you can't use "Pensa che", as it's the 2nd person imperative (and you can't use it in this case) or the 3rd person indicative present (that's incorrect!)
    Moreover you have to use "puzzi" because is subjunctive (there's "che", a conjunction) instead of "puzza" that is 3rd person indicative.

    You can also use "scorregge" or "scuregge" instead of "scoregge", they are all correct.

    Sorry for my English, I'm just learning and I'm not good so far.
     

    tezza417

    Member
    USA - Inglese
    Moreover you have to use "puzzi" because is subjunctive (there's "che", a conjunction) instead of "puzza" that is 3rd person indicative.
    Okay, I'm a little confused. If you break down the sentence and remove the subjunctive, it would be "La tua merda non puzza, ma le tue scorregge ti tradiscono."

    But if the subjunctive is added, why does the tense of "puzza" change to "puzzi"?

    Sorry for my English, I'm just learning and I'm not good so far.
    Sounds good to me! ;)
     
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