You who wants/want

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  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    For you who want peanuts, they're in the gallery. (Multiple people)
    For you who wants peanuts, they're in the gallery. (One person)
    For them who want peanuts, they're in the gallery. (Multiple people)
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    For you who want peanuts, they're in the gallery. (Multiple people)
    For you who wants peanuts, they're in the gallery. (One person)
    For them who want peanuts, they're in the gallery. (Multiple people)
    I'm unhappy about the second one here, Copyright.

    Surely, because it's you want, if must be For you (singular) who want peanuts etc.

    It would be For he who wants peanuts etc. because it's he wants.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    You can try these sentences as starting For any of you who want.../For anyone who wants... .

    That's my solution to problem sentences: find a better way. If you use the singular that includes the plural.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I'm unhappy about the second one here, Copyright.

    Surely, because it's you want, if must be For you (singular) who want peanuts etc.

    It would be For he who wants peanuts etc. because it's he wants.
    I see what you mean, but I was going by sound and by using "who wants peanuts" as a descriptor – perhaps that's an incorrect approach, but "want" doesn't sound right to me, even if it is. Still, I have little experience with this construction because I don't use it.

    My thinking:
    For you (who wants peanuts), they're in the gallery.

    But I'm not trying to sell it to anyone. :)
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Yes, I understood that and you're no doubt right. I think I'll stay out of conjugations for awhile (like forever). :)
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    For you who wants or want?

    For them who want or wants?
    I've realised I didn't answer Sdlvnsyh's question.:oops:

    I wouldn't use any of those options, myself. I'd say:
    For those of you who want...
    or
    For those who want...

    Or, perhaps, For anyone who wants...

    Much would depend on the context.:cool:
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I've realised I didn't answer Sdlvnsyh's question.:oops:

    I wouldn't use any of those options, myself. I'd say:
    For those of you who want...
    or
    For those who want...

    Or, perhaps, For anyone who wants...

    Much would depend on the context.:cool:
    What if we're talking about one person "you"?
     

    Sdlvnsyh

    Member
    Bahasa - English
    If i say, "for me who loves/love you, i'll give anything that you want"

    So, love or loves?

    Sorry for asking too much. And i want to say thank you for answering my question.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Then it might be "for the one who wants peanuts..." or "If you want peanuts...";).
    I should have been more explicit: I was asking about my sentence in post 2:

    For you who want/wants peanuts, they're in the gallery. (One person)
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    If i say, "for me who loves/love you, i'll give anything that you want"

    So, love or loves?

    Sorry for asking too much. And i want to say thank you for answering my question.
    It's For me, but me can't happily be the subject of your sentence, Sdlvnshyh.

    One way round is to cut the opening and say I, who love you, will give you anything etc.
     

    Dianette

    Senior Member
    Ecuador - Spanish / Brazil - Portuguese
    I would say that it's me = I am the person who wants.
    The list given by Thomas in #8 does not always work.
    Completely agree.

    About the verb love: "its me who loves you" - "for you who love me"

    And if we try with other verbs?

    "For you who watch the game, the peanuts are on the table" - it would not make sense to say "for you who watches the game" right?
    "For you who play as the goal keeper..."
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I should have been more explicit: I was asking about my sentence in post 2:

    For you who want/wants peanuts, they're in the gallery. (One person)
    Apologies, MrC - it was me that wasn't explicit:oops:.

    What I meant was that, for a singular "you", I wouldn't actually use the "For you who want{s}" construction at all....
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    What I meant was that, for a singular "you", I wouldn't actually use the "For you who want{s}" construction at all....
    Neither would I, but was curious about people who would. :rolleyes: Not to worry ... I think I'll go find something else to do. :)
     
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