You will never deceive your feelings/heart

  • abusaf

    Senior Member
    Sweden
    I would say

    لن تخون قلبك أبداً و ذلك أمر جميل

    lan takhoona qalbak abadan. wa dhalika amrun jameel.

    بيد أن الوقت فات

    Baida Anna al-waqta faata
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Some comments:

    abusaf said:
    I would say

    لن تخون قلبك أبداً و ذلك أمر جميل
    تخون is "betray." "Deceive" is تخدع.
    Also, you only translated "heart" and not "feelings."

    لن تخدع مشاعرك/قلبك أبداً وذلك أمر جميل

    بيد أن الوقت فات
    I don't know what بيد means but anyway, my translation would be

    ولكن الآن قد فات الأوان

    which is the most common way to translate "it's too late."

    Baida Anna al-waqta faata
     

    abusaf

    Senior Member
    Sweden
    بيد أن means "However.." "But...". It's a popular phrase in Arabic literature.

    With regards to يخون not meaning decieve, we'll agree to disagree. Deceive is actually one of the first translations given to خان if you look it up in a dictionary.

    But to each his own.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    abusaf said:
    بيد أن means "However.." "But...". It's a popular phrase in Arabic literature.
    No wonder I wasn't familiar with it. ;)

    With regards to يخون not meaning decieve, we'll agree to disagree. Deceive is actually one of the first translations given to خان if you look it up in a dictionary.
    We've discussed before how inadequate dictionaries are. In this context, خدع is more appropriate and common. The first thing I think of when I see خان is betrayal.

    But just out of curiosity, I looked up خان in two good online dictionaries and neither of them lists "deceive" at all.
     

    abusaf

    Senior Member
    Sweden
    Well if online dictionaries are what you turn to, then of course you will regard them as inadequate.

    If you look up خان in Hans Wehr for example, you will find deceive listed as a translation (twice even). Like I said, I believe that خان is more suitable in the sentence at hand and if you disagree then that is certainly your right.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    abusaf said:
    Well if online dictionaries are what you turn to, then of course you will regard them as inadequate.
    What gave you the impression that online dictionaries are all I turn to? In my opinion most if not all dictionaries are inadequate. Just because a definition or translation is listed in one does not make it suitable in a given context. I only referred to a couple online dictionaries - which, by the way, says nothing about their quality - because I'm currently in the States and do not have access to a paper dictionary. Furthermore, I was driven by curiosity as I stated and not a desire for confirmation.
    If you look up خان in Hans Wehr for example, you will find deceive listed as a translation (twice even). Like I said, I believe that خان is more suitable in the sentence at hand and if you disagree then that is certainly your right.
    It's not a matter of disagreement; it's a matter of which verb is better in this context. خان evokes the connotation of betrayal and therefore assumes a wider context not suggested in the English original. خدع is a neutral word for "deceive" and is therefore a more appropriate translation without further context. I have yet to hear a valid, convincing reason as to why you prefer خان in this sentence.
     

    abusaf

    Senior Member
    Sweden
    Don't make such a big deal out of it, it's only a sentence :)

    However, the reason I would choose يخون is because I feel it to be more suitable. And you said that يخدع means deceive and يخون means betray, did you know that if you look in a book of synonoms, the first synonom listed for deceive is :

    Synonyms: betray, mislead, beguile


    The word deceive has many meanings, and can carry the same meaning as betray.

    However, let's not argue over this, its a trifle matter. And it actually is about disagreement.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Once again you come to me with citations from a reference book.

    Yes, betrayal can imply deception, but in this sentence we have no reason to assume that betrayal is implied or meant. As you well know, when we translate we should try to be as literal as possible and deviate from the original only when it is syntactially or stylistically necessary.

    And yes, it's only a sentence, but that doesn't mean it can't lead to interesting linguistic discussions. :)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top