you will remain banned

Shinog

Member
English - UK
Bonjour!

I am trying to tell a customer (gaming community):

Sorry, but you will not be unbanned. You broke the rules and you will remain banned.

Does this make sense? The part I'm stuck on is 'You broke the rules and you will remain banned.' I gave it my best go and hopefully you can help me fix any errors? Also, did I use the appropriate phrases for: banni = banned and enfrient = broke and tu ne vas pas = you will not be. Ta!

My try: [...] et tu seras rester banni.

Au revoir!
 
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  • Gravos

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    [...]

    on your question, say : "[...] et tu resteras banni"
     
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    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    I think "bannir" is a semi faux ami. Applied to a person, it is usually "banished", whereas a practice is "banned", outlawed, forbidden, etc. But in this case, how about "exclu"?
     

    Shinog

    Member
    English - UK
    I think "bannir" is a semi faux ami. Applied to a person, it is usually "banished", whereas a practice is "banned", outlawed, forbidden, etc. But in this case, how about "exclu"?
    Already spoke to two French-Speaking friends (one French/Paris, one French/Quebec) and both said banni was more appropriate for the context and all French players I've spoken too have understood fine. Unfortunately these are both away/busy so I came here ^_^
     

    CarlosRapido

    Senior Member
    français - English (Can)
    ain't was saying, and I agree, that it is the English banned that is faulty in this context - it should be banished when speaking of a person, which translates to the correct banni en français

    Proofreading requests are banned on this forum, asking for, or answering them may get you banished.
    Les demandes de relecture sont interdites sur le forum, vous pourriez être banni....
     
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    pointvirgule

    Senior Member
    langue française
    Whether it is "correct" or not as per dictionary definitions, banned is the usual term in the context of forums – WR being no exception (as we can see under the names of members that were excluded).

    Autre sugg. for Shinog: votre bannissement est définitif / n'est pas révocable.
     

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    I think "bannir" is a semi faux ami. Applied to a person, it is usually "banished", whereas a practice is "banned"
    Yes, banished is not said concerning membership in an online community. As others said previously, the usual term in English is banned, even if it may not literally correspond to FR banni.

    (And here we say proofreading requests are not permitted, forbidden--not banned.)
     
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    Chat Perché

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    Donc normalement vous diriez aussi que quelqu'un est "banni" d'un forum ?

    He's banned from the forum. = Il a été banni du forum. ? Exclu du forum ?
    Bonjour à tous,
    Oui, je dirais 'il a été banni du forum'. Par contre, 'il a été exclu du forum' me parait moins naturel, même si cela n'est pas faux !
     

    CarlosRapido

    Senior Member
    français - English (Can)
    @ Widan - you have a point in this specific context.

    @ Chat Perché ; une autre possibilité qu'on entend souvent de ce côté de la flaque - il a été écarté du forum - je ne sais trop si ce serait naturel en France...
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Français, Québec ♀
    Je ne crois pas qu'écarter soit un régionalisme, si on l'utilise dans ce sens extrait du CNRTL :
    En partic., domaine soc . Écarter (d'un emploi, d'une situation). Chasser, éliminer, évincer.
    Il a été évincé / expulsé / radié du forum seraient d'autres options, qui ont d'autres équivalents anglais.

    À mon avis, banni demeure le plus courant pour traduire banned.
     
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