youp-la-boum

sarel29

Senior Member
English
Bonjour!

I'm trying to understand the meaning of the phrase 'youp-la-boum' and although I can find each individual word in the dictionary, it looks as though it has some colloquial meaning which is escaping me. Here it is in the context:

« Comment vous lui avez fait comprendre pour les lits ? demanda Magrat.
– J’y ai dit : Hé, m’sieur, youp-la-boum presse tôt kif-kif numéro trois », la renseigna Nounou Ogg.


That itself is a translation of this in English:

‘How did you make him understand about the beds?’ said Magrat.
‘I said, “Hey mister, jigajig toot sweet all same No. 3”,’ said Nanny Ogg.


So, basically, what I would like to know is if 'youp-la-boum' functions in French in the same way as 'jigajig' does in English?

Thanks!
 
  • Jasmine tea

    Senior Member
    French - France
    On dit "youp-la boum" pour une galipette d'enfant,
    ici ce doit être au sujet d'une galipette d'adultes?!

    Ça vient d'une publicité ancienne (années 80)... "Prosper"

    Can we have more context?
     

    LART01

    Senior Member
    French-France
    Well
    For starters, I think it is Yop la boum.
    This expression in french is not limited to "sexual intercourse" insinuations unlike
    the english expression you mentionned earlier
    I would use= Ta Da= like the sound of a fanfare accompanying an announcement
     

    ClaireOdeOLune

    Member
    French - France
    "youp-la-boum" is an onomatopoeia, I'd say it sounds like someone slipping and falling on the floor. But this sentence doesn't make any sense to me, it must be all about the consonance of the words. This counts for "kif-kif" too.
     

    Full Stop

    Member
    French (France)
    "Youp la boum" is an interjection that expresses joy, happiness.
    A famous French TV ad for a gingerbread in the 80s, as mentioned by an earlier poster, had a song that went "Prosper, youp la boum, c'est le roi du pain d'épices!".
    It doesn't necessarily have a sexual connotation at all. It depends on the context.
     

    sarel29

    Senior Member
    English
    Hi,

    Thanks for the help with this. The context is three women who are travelling through a generically 'foreign' country and the extract is an explanation of how they have managed to book three beds for themselves for the night.

    Thanks!
     

    Uncle Bob

    Senior Member
    British English
    Perhaps the sexual bit should be explained: Nanny Ogg is an earthy character who tends to embarass her colleagues with her fairly vulgar expressions.
    I can't think of an alternative translation of "jigajig" in this case but then Pratchettese must, though fun, be a devil to translate.
     
    Last edited:

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    The fun in Pratchett's original is that Nanny Ogg doesn't actually speak a word of any foreign language properly. She makes herself understood by stringing together colonial and army catchphrases: tout de suite becomes toot sweet, for instance, as pronounced by British soldiers 1914-1918; all same is pidgin Chinese.

    Sir Terry Pratchett is a master of this and well deserved his knighthood; Patrick Couton also deserved the gold medal he won for best translation of the year.
     

    Fred_C

    Senior Member
    Français
    "Youp la boum" is an interjection that expresses joy, happiness.
    A famous French TV ad for a gingerbread in the 80s, as mentioned by an earlier poster, had a song that went "Prosper, youp la boum, c'est le roi du pain d'épices!".
    It doesn't necessarily have a sexual connotation at all. It depends on the context.

    Bonjour,
    Permettez-moi de vous faire remarquer que le texte "Prosper Youp là boum" est une chanson de Maurice Chevalier de 1935. Cette chanson a été détournée pour en faire une publicité. (en changeant un peu les paroles)
    rendons à César ce qui est à César.
    Parce que c'est un peu comme croire que Carmen de Bizet a écrit pour faire une publicité pour un produit d'entretien.

    (Moi, je m'en fiche, je n'aime pas la musique, mais ça pourrait en vexer d'autres...)
     

    silentbobfr

    New Member
    French - France
    Hi,

    In my humble opinion, "youp la boum" expresses joy.

    So I'd say "yippie ki-yay" (thanks, Bruce Willis!), because "Youp la boum" sounds old-fashioned.

    Bye
     

    jpbardez

    New Member
    French
    Bonjour!

    I'm trying to understand the meaning of the phrase 'youp-la-boum' and although I can find each individual word in the dictionary, it looks as though it has some colloquial meaning which is escaping me. Here it is in the context:

    « Comment vous lui avez fait comprendre pour les lits ? demanda Magrat.
    – J’y ai dit : Hé, m’sieur, youp-la-boum presse tôt kif-kif numéro trois », la renseigna Nounou Ogg.


    That itself is a translation of this in English:

    ‘How did you make him understand about the beds?’ said Magrat.
    ‘I said, “Hey mister, jigajig toot sweet all same No. 3”,’ said Nanny Ogg.


    So, basically, what I would like to know is if 'youp-la-boum' functions in French in the same way as 'jigajig' does in English?

    Thanks!
    This is part of the song "Prosper" by Maurice Chevalier. You can listen to it on if you look for "prosper".
    Basically, it is a silly, mysterious and/or magical phrase, similar to the ones used by Mary Poppins in the bank scene.
     

    jpbardez

    New Member
    French
    This is part of the song "Prosper" by Maurice Chevalier. You can listen to it on if you look for "prosper" on You Tube (I'm not allowed to publish this link).
    Basically, it is a silly, mysterious and/or magical phrase, similar to the ones used by Mary Poppins in the bank scene.
     
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