your barn door is open

yannalan

Senior Member
france, french, breton
EN your barn door is open
FR Les magasins sont ouverts/c'est jour de paie ?
nl : de franse kerk is niet afgesloten

And you ? Have you humoristic means to tell a man his fiies are unzipped, in your languages , ?
 
  • ilocas2

    Banned
    Czech
    Czech:

    Zapni si poklopec, uletí ti sportovec. - something like - Close your flies or your sportsman will fly away.

    Very few google hits, but I heard it couple of times and don't know why it's so rare on internet.
     

    sakvaka

    Senior Member
    Finnish:
    (humorous) Hevoset karkaa. (The horses are running/fleeing away, can be integrated in phrases: Hei, sulta meinaa hevoset karata!).
    (polite, with unknown persons) Anteeksi, mutta Teillä on jäänyt sepalus auki. Excuse me, but you have [accidentally] left your (how-do-you-call-it-in-English) open.
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Dutch: zijn de duiven gelost - but it is not very common. (Have the pigeons been released [that is the basis of a traditional sport around here: taking them somewhere and having them return as soon as possible ?) The official word is 'gulp'. I wondered whether we don't also use: "Je vliegendeur is open" (your fly door is open, literally). That 'fly' seems to be based on this...
     
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    apmoy70

    Senior Member
    Greek
    In Turkish:

    Dükkanın açık = Your shop is open
    We use exactly the same phrase with the noun in plural:
    «Τα μαγαζιά σου/σας είναι ανοικτά/ανοιχτά»
    Ta maɣazi'a su [2nd person sing. or informal]/sas [2nd person plural or formal] 'ine anik'ta/anix'ta [vernacular]
    "Your shops are open"
     

    Selyd

    Senior Member
    ucraniano
    Ucrainian:
    - Ворота відкриті /vorota vidkryti/ - Open gate
    - Гості їдуть /hosti yidut'/ - The visitors go
     

    Selyd

    Senior Member
    ucraniano
    selyd made me remember one more russian saying: Закрой калитку! (close the wicket).
    В "Тенях исчезают в полночь", кажется там, говорили -
    Ворота закрой! Что-то в этом роде.
     

    Hakro

    Senior Member
    Finnish - Finland
    A lady said to me:
    - Excuse me, your garage door is open.
    I smiled and answered:
    - Do you see there my big black Cadillac?
    - No, I'm sorry, there's only a red Mini with flat rear tires.
     

    Messquito

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Taiwan 中文 Taiwanese Hokkien 臺語
    [Moderator's Note: Merged with a previous thread]
    What do you say to people when they have their zipper on their jeans down?

    In Taiwan (Chinese) we say:
    你的石門水庫沒關。 Your reservoir is not shut.
     
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    810senior

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Japanese: 社会の窓が開いている(the window of society opens). I like this kind of figuration. :)
     

    apmoy70

    Senior Member
    Greek
    Greek:

    «Τα μαγαζιά σου είναι ανοικτά» [ta maɣaziˈa su ˈine anikˈta] --> your shops are open
    «Το φερμουάρ σου είναι ανοικτό» [to fermuˈar su ˈine anikˈto] --> your zipper is open

    Some etymology:
    -MoGr neut. «μαγαζί» [maɣaˈzi] (nom. sing.), «μαγαζιά» [maɣaziˈa] (nom. pl.) --> (colloq.) store(s), shop(s), (plural only) zipper < ByzGr neut. «μαγαζίν» magazín (nom. sing.), «μαγαζία» magazía (nom. pl.) --> store(s), shop(s) < Ven. magasín < Ar. مَخَازِن ‎(maḵāzin) --> store, shop, warehouse.
    -MoGr neut. indeclinable noun «φερμουάρ» [fermuˈar] --> zipper, zip < Fr. fermoir.
     

    ilocas2

    Banned
    Czech
    There was a thread on this topic but it was focused on humoristic phrases, so I will write here the neutral phrase.

    Czech: Máš rozepnutý poklopec.
     
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    Dymn

    Senior Member
    Catalan:

    fly: bragueta (from French braguette)
    Neutral sentence: tens la bragueta oberta ("you have the fly open")
    Humoristic sentence: se t'escaparà l'ocellet ("your li'l bird's gonna get out")
     

    Armas

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    Finnish neutral:

    Sepaluksesi on auki "Your fly is open" or sinulla on sepalus auki "you have the fly open".
    Vetoketjusi on auki "Your zipper is open" or sinulla on vetoketju auki "you have the zipper open".
     

    Frieder

    Senior Member
    In German you may hear the question "Ist schon Frühling?" (is it spring already?), because traditionally that's the time when you open all windows to let in the pleasant spring air...
     

    nimak

    Senior Member
    Macedonian
    In Turkish:

    Dükkanın açık = Your shop is open
    Macedonian uses the Turkism дуќан (duḱan) ['ducan] to say it in a humoristic way:
    Дуќанот ти е отворен. (Dúḱanot ti e ótvoren.) "Your shop is open." lit. "The-shop your is open."

    Otherwise you can say:
    Патентот ти е отворен. (Paténtot ti e ótvoren.) lit "The-zipper your is open."
    Патентот ти е откопчен. (Paténtot ti e ótkopčen.) lit "The-zipper your is unbuttoned."
     
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    momai

    Senior Member
    Arabic - Syria
    In Turkish:

    Dükkanın açık = Your shop is open
    Macedonian uses the Turkism дуќан (duḱan) ['ducan] to say it in a humoristic way:
    Дуќанот ти е отворен. "Your shop is open." lit. "The-shop your is open."

    Otherwise you can say:
    Патентот ти е отворен. (Paténtot ti e ótvoren.) lit "The-zipper your is open."
    Патентот ти е откопчен. (Paténtot ti e ótkopčen.) lit "The-zipper your is unbuttoned."
    In Syrian Arabic we use the same expression and the same word, too. دكانك مفتوح dikkaan-ak maftuuħ. Very interesting!!
     

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    In French:
    Le petit oiseau va s'envoler (The little bird is going to fly away)
    (not to be confused with a close expression "le petit oiseau va sortir", which is used when you are about to press the camera button to take a picture and want to warn the people you take a picture of)

    Close to the Spanish equivalent:
    Se escapa tu pajarillo (Your little bird is flying away)

    But one tasty I learnt is the British one:
    You’re flying without a license

    I see from your posts that Finnish refer to horses, while Latin refer to a little bird. Something to do with the size of the object in question? :D
     
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