your hair is everywhere

Brave Heart

Senior Member
Japan, Japanese
Could you tell me the meaning of "your hair is everywhere" in the following context?

"I notice your hair is everywhere. Mind if I brush it away from your face?"

I've heard that "your hair is everywhere" has something to do with "rough hair", so does this mean "you have rough hair"?

If so, is it a common expression? I'm asking this quesiton because when I googled, I found some cases where this phrase is used to mean, like, "your hair is all over the house".

Thanks. :)
 
  • volky

    Senior Member
    Spanish/English
    It means that your hair is everywhere on your face, that's why I want to brush it away from it.

    Probably this person has too much hair, or they are on a windy area and the hair is getting in her face all the time.
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    "Your hair is everywhere," means your hair is falling in your face, or maybe your bangs are hanging in your eyes, too. Maybe you've got a lot of static electricity in your hair because you didn't condition it and it sticks out all over the place.

    Here in the the US, we call it "fly-away hair."

    You can also have human hair all over the house, too, if you have long hair, because you'll notice those longer strands more than the shorter ones. Did you know that, twice a year, you lose more hair than usual? That's what my hairdresser told me. I'm not sure what that means. :( I have medium long hair and I find my long strands a lot.

    Also, certain breeds of dogs have hair, not fur. I used to have an Old English Sheepdog. Trust me, her hair used to be all over the house.

    I currently have a long-haired white cat. Even though it's actually fur, we call it hair, and that stuff, especially because it's springtime, is everywhere.

    The terms you use make a lot of sense and are used correctly in just the areas I've written about here.


    AngelEyes
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    Your hair is very messy. Yes, it can be used in the context of hair that has been shed, and really is everywhere.
    A similar expression is "your hair is all over the place".
    A relatively recent addition to the English language is the expression "to have a bad-hair day" - when you just can't seem to get your hair to do what you want it to.
     

    Brave Heart

    Senior Member
    Japan, Japanese
    Hi liliput. Thanks for your help. I appreciate it. :)

    Is my understanding correct that "your hair is all over the place" also means "your hair is very messy" ?

    I understand "to have a bad-hair day" is often used to refer to an unlucky day. Could you tell me how frequently this phrase is used to mean "have messy hair" ?
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    "your hair is all over the place" can be used for both contexts, just the same as "your hair is everywhere".
    I understand the phrase "bad-hair day" to be taken fairly literally and have never known it to be used in terms of luck but perhaps some people use it in the manner you suggest.
     
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