Your heirs didn't loom so big.

Agito a42

Senior Member
Source: The Flight of Dragons (1982), an American animated fantasy movie.

Peter wants to rise some money for manufacturing his own board game. He shows his pocket watch to his old friend who works at the antique shop.
Peter: This is an heirloom. It must be worth something.
Friend: Your heirs didn't loom so big. If I give you $50, I'd be fired.

heirloom.jpg


Obviously, "your heirs didn't loom so big" is some sort of pun, but does it make sense to you? If so, could explain it?

Full transcript: The Flight of Dragons (1982) Movie Script | SS
 
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It works as a bit of wordplay implying that that his heirs didn't leave him anything of value. But a few seconds later, it becomes clear that it doesn't stand up to scrutiny. Peter's heirs will be his children (probably) and so can't have left him anything. :rolleyes:

    But I suspect this doesn't get noticed by the average viewer. They'll just smile and move on . . .
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    why I found it most confusing - he used "heirs" and the past tense at the same time, which is plain meaningless.
    Not necessarily. It might mean When you bought the watch your heirs were not uppermost (idiom: did not loom large) in your mind, because you bought a cheap one. Your main purpose was not to bequeath something of great value to your heirs.
    loom large

    Edit: After reading #6, I suppose it would be better to say When the watch was bought your heirs did not loom large in the buyer's mind.
     
    Last edited:

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    :thumbsup: That's possible. But in saying that it's an heirloom do we not infer that he inherited it?

    I fear we may be analysing a throwaway line too closely, and divesting it of any humour it contained. :)

    Cross-posted.
     

    Agito a42

    Senior Member
    I fear we may be analysing a throwaway line too closely, and divesting it of any humour it contained.
    I may be wrong, but I think se16teddy is only saying that in some other context (when subject to close scrutiny) the sentence "Your heirs didn't loom so big" might not be as meaningless as in the OP.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I do believe heirloom implies it was inherited. So the response is meaningless but still funny, because the idea clearly comes across that it's near worthless and hardly a precious antique.
     
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