Your typing is way too slow/you type way too slow

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Someone types way too slow. So can I use:
Your typing is way too slow.

I mean can we use this sentence in place of :
You type way too slow.

This was in a comment on YouTube, about some video. So this question popped up in my mind.
Thank you :)
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Slow is an adjective, describing a noun: Your typing is slow... My car is slow...
    Slowly is an adverb, describing a verb: You type slowly... I drive slowly...

    Why is way too rural AmE? I don't know if it is, but when I was a child I watched lots of cowboy films and they spoke like that. "Gee, Sheriff, them rustlers are way too fast for me!"
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Your typing is way too slow (adjective)
    You type way too slow (adverb)
    You type way too slowly (adverb)

    Slow
    can legitimately be used as an adverb (Oxford gives it a dictionary entry as such), but you’d be unlikely to find that usage except in casual/informal speech.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    sounds like rural American
    Well, I don't know about rural, but it sure has an American feel to it. It seems to have made inroads into BE, because OED marks this usage as "Orig. U.S.".
    but when I was a child I watched lots of cowboy films and they spoke like that.
    I don't think the logic of that is entirely impeccable.
    I saw a picture of the Pope once, and he was wearing a funny hat.
    They tell me that he lives in Rome. I hear that when you're in Rome, you should do as the Romans do.
    The Pope must be conforming to a local custom. => All Romans wear funny hats.
    :D

    Would urban cowboys have spoken differently? I don't know, I don't think there were many.
    Let me see, what else distinguished cities from the Wild West? They had way ( :) ) more and better schools in cities. => Cowboys spoke like that because they weren't very well educated.

    I'm glad to see (from ngrams) that "far too" is still very much more popular in AE than "way too", and "much too" is inbetween. In BE the contrast is starker, with "way too" being relatively less popular than in AE.
     

    AnythingGoes

    Senior Member
    English - USA (Midwest/Appalachia)
    I'm glad to see (from ngrams) that "far too" is still very much more popular in AE than "way too", and "much too" is inbetween. In BE the contrast is starker, with "way too" being relatively less popular than in AE.
    Way too is much more common in spoken American English, but I guess it still feels sufficiently informal that it tends to be avoided in writing. It has nothing to do with urban vs. rural usage.
     
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