You're always welcome to/in (city)

  • Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    Hello, Harrisjr, and Welcome to the Forum!:)
    I would say You're always welcome in London, and
    You're always welcome to come to London.

     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Remember that to be welcome to something can mean - It's very nasty, and you can have lots of it. It's a disagreeable thing to say to someone.

    It's a classic error. It was said that one of the grandest hotels in Moscow had a sign over the reception desk: IF THIS IS YOUR FIRST VISIT TO THE USSR YOU ARE WELCOME TO IT.

    To be welcome to something can have a polite meaning too, but we have to be careful with the expression.
     

    redgiant

    Senior Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    You're always welcome in London, and
    You're always welcome to come to London.

    Hi,
    Do they have different meanings?The first one sounds like your presence in London is welcome, and the second one means your traveling to London is welcome. Do native speakers use them with the same meaning?
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Thomas Tompion (post #3) is right. To be "welcome to" something can mean "you can have it; I hate it". For example:
    A: I love pistachio ice cream.
    B: Ugh! You're welcome to it!

    To be sure of correct interpretation, "you're always welcome in _______" or "you're always welcome here" is best.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top