you're in time [=phrase indicating someone is off-topic?]

abda2405

Senior Member
Russian
Hello there my dear friends. Could you please tell me, what do you say when someone says something completely off the topic? For example, when a group of people are talking about kinds of animals and one of them says "I need a banana", what would be the logical answer to that, something like "whow you're in time". Dictionaries don't have it:(
 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    "You're in time" doesn't make an sense in this situation. Can you explain more about what you are trying to say?
     

    abda2405

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Well imagine a situation: you're talking with your friends, say, about cars, you talk and talk for about an hour(it doesn't matter for how long though) and one of them suddenly says "I want a banana" or "Japanese girls rock" anything off the topic. What will be your reply? I mean in Russian we'd most likely say something like "lol, you're so in the topic" but in English it doesn't sound okay to me at least...
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    A variety of sarcastic responses might be possible, but the most common thing to say is probably "What does that have to do with anything?"
     

    abda2405

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Oh thanks:). Anything shorter?:) Never mind, I just said it outloud and it sounded right:). Thanks a lot! Although, it sounds a little more agressive, it should sound sarcastic and funny:). Or maybe not agressive, but the fact that it's a question confuses me a little...
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    How about: Wow, that was relevant.
    Yes , that would work in BE as well. :thumbsup:


    A humorous one is And.... back in the room!* This is quite popular in BE at the moment. I don't know if is used in AE.

    ____________________________________________________________
    *Note
    This expression was originally a phrase used by stage hypnotists when bringing an audience member out of a trance. The implication when used humorously is that the person has been asleep or lost in their own thoughts while the discussion was going on.
     
    Last edited:

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Based on listening to my kids, I think the currently popular phrase is "that's so random."
    Yes - that works. However it is more likely to be used by younger people - let's say teenagers. I suppose as time goes on they will become adults and it will become a grown-up saying. (Although by then it will be out of fashion and their kids will mock them :D)
     
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