you're quite welcome / you're most welcome

eli7

Senior Member
Persian (Farsi)
A: thank you.
B: you are welcome.

A:Hi. I'm Bob. Sarah's husband.
B: Oh! HI. please come in. You are welcome OR welcome?
Are "you're welcome" and "welcome" the same in the meaning and usage?
And do "you are welcome" and "you are quite welcome" have the same meaning?

A:Hi. I'm Bob, Frank's friend. I'm too tired and cannot keep walking anymore. May I rest at your place for a while?
B: You are most welcome.
Is this usage correct? Is this the same in the meaning with "you are quite welcome"?
 
  • Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    A:Hi. I'm Bob, Frank's friend. I'm too tired and cannot keep walking anymore. May I rest at your place for a while?
    B: You are most welcome.
    Is this usage correct? Is this the same in the meaning with "you are quite welcome"?
    Yes it is correct, and yes it means the same thing.
     
    Last edited:

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Beryl is mistaken.

    The second example you gave should not be "You are welcome", but only "Welcome". To say "you're welcome" after someone says "thank you", and to say "Welcome" to a visitor to your house, do not mean the same thing, and you do not use the same words in the same way for both.
     

    eli7

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    Beryl is mistaken.

    The second example you gave should not be "You are welcome", but only "Welcome". To say "you're welcome" after someone says "thank you", and to say "Welcome" to a visitor to your house, do not mean the same thing, and you do not use the same words in the same way for both.
    So, "you are welcome = you are quite welcome = you are most welcome" . Right? And all of them are used when someone thanks us and we say one of these expressions.
     

    eli7

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    Yes that's right.
    So, in this dialogue

    A:Hi. I'm Bob, Frank's friend. I'm too tired and cannot keep walking anymore. May I rest at your place for a while?
    B: You are most welcome

    If you are most welcome means yourwelcome and is used in the case of thanking someone, it doesn't make sense here in this sentence!
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I think that it still makes sense but it sounds very formal and old-fashioned to me. Adding the "most" avoids the association with "you're welcome" (the response to "thank you"), at least for me. I may have heard "you are most welcome" only two or three times in my life, outside of a period drama. :)
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    So, in this dialogue

    A:Hi. I'm Bob, Frank's friend. I'm too tired and cannot keep walking anymore. May I rest at your place for a while?
    B: You are most welcome

    If you are most welcome means yourwelcome and is used in the case of thanking someone, it doesn't make sense here in this sentence!
    I don't follow your logic here.

    As far as I can tell you have presented three scenarios, and they are (1) in response to 'thank you', (2) as a greeting on ushering someone over the threshold and into your home (i.e. 'come in :)'), and (3) on extending some hospitality to a tired friend of Frank.

    In simplified terms, here is the range of most common responses:

    (1). A: 'Thank you' (to B) - B: 'You're welcome' (to A)

    (2). A (knocking on B's door) - B (opening the door): 'Hello A, welcome'

    (3). A (to B): 'can stay at your house tonight?' - B (to A): 'you are welcome to stay at my house'


    Some less common responses:

    (1). A: 'Thank you' (to B) - B: 'You're very welcome' (to A), or - B: 'You're most welcome' (to A), or - B: 'You're quite welcome' (to A), or - B: 'You're more than welcome' (to A)

    (3). A (to B): 'can stay at your house tonight?' - B (to A): 'you are welcome to stay at my house',or - B (to A): 'you are very welcome to stay at my house', or - B (to A): 'you are most welcome to stay at my house', or - B (to A): 'you are quite welcome to stay at my house', or - B (to A): 'you are more than welcome to stay at my house'

    other formulations are available.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I think that James (post #8) is exactly right. In the situation you describe (assuming it's not a period drama), we'd probably reply, "Of course!" or "Sure! No problem!"
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Sorry to muddy the waters - but I'd just like to add that I would never say "You are quite welcome" to anyone. It would sound exceedingly half-hearted to me....

    (There are other threads about the AmE/BrE difference in usage of "quite".)
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    I'm a user of both:
    You are quite welcome.
    You are most welcome.

    blueblooded, I would use that construction without "the": sleeping used to be most welcome (for me) after swimming
     
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