You're "stuffed"?

Spinda

Member
Cantonese, Mandarin
I saw it in a TV show Horrible Histories, Season 1 Episode 6:
"So if you too are a Victorian child and you've had an accident at work, bad luck, you're stuffed."
What does "stuffed" mean here? Does it has the same meaning as in the phrase "get stuffed"? Or something like "unfortunate"?
Thank you:)
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Well, the other rude words that can be used in 'Get __!' can also be used here: 'you're __'. They mean you're doomed - you haven't got a hope - there's nothing you can do.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Here are two related senses from Oxford Dictionaries:
    2 [usually in imperative] British informal Used to express indifference towards or rejection of (something): stuff the diet!
    3 British informal Defeat heavily in sport: Town got stuffed every week
     

    Spinda

    Member
    Cantonese, Mandarin
    I guessed it meant "doomed" but I couldn't find the exact definition in dictionaries. I wonder if others would misunderstand when I say "you're stuffed".
     

    Copperknickers

    Senior Member
    Scotland - Scots and English
    It's basically a euphemism for the more aggressive expressions 'you're screwed', or 'you're f***ed', used because Horrible Histories is a children's programme. Its not very common, but people would know what you mean, and it's probably advisable to use it instead of the above versions if speaking to children or the elderly.
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It's basically a euphemism for the more aggressive expressions 'you're screwed', or 'you're f***ed', used because Horrible Histories is a children's programme. Its not very common, but people would know what you mean, and it's probably advisable to use it instead of the above versions if speaking to children or the elderly.
    Yes. The expression would appear to have sexual connotations, but these seem to have been largely forgotten: Nat's Oxford entries are marked "informal", not "vulgar", and I was never pulled up when I used the expression as a child.
     
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