you're welcome or no problem

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ESC85

Senior Member
Korean
At online game, I got a huge bonus money, and I shared them with other online friends of mine.

One of them said "Thank you!"

In this situation, I guess "no problem" will be good, instead of "you're welcome".

What do you think?
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hello, ESC85. You're probably going to read different opinions on this topic. Some people love the phrase and use it almost exclusively when they answer "Thank you." I hate it. I especially hate it when I hear it coming from some clerk at a store. It sounds snotty and impertinent to me and makes me want to reply: "I'm sure it's not a problem. If it were, you really shouldn't be working here."

    Of course your situation is different. You are not speaking as a clerk at a store. Instead, you are replying to some friend of yours who wrote you a message. That friend of yours might like "No problem." It's hard to tell what people will like until you ask them directly.
     

    Askalon

    Senior Member
    English (US)
    Yes, I agree. "No problem" is generally a much more casual way of saying "you're welcome". I use it in situations where maybe I did a small favor for someone, so the situation doesn't call for anything more than a quick "thanks!" on their part and a simple "no problem" on mine.


    Saying "you're welcome" I don't think would be inappropriate in the situation you described, but it is a bit heavier and more sincere.
     

    abenr

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    At online game, I got a huge bonus money, and I shared them with other online friends of mine.

    One of them said "Thank you!"

    In this situation, I guess "no problem" will be good, instead of "you're welcome".

    What do you think?
    I'm a "you're welcome" person, and don't particularly like "no problem." That said, "no problem" people seem to be taking over the English-language world. Sigh.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    If someone requests a favour of me and I carry it out, the person (usually) will say "Thank you!" This is the only time when I might consider saying "No problem" - meaning (for me, at least) "It was not a problem for me that you asked a favour of me".

    If I do something unsolicited for someone, and they say "Thank you" that is when I would never say "No problem" but always something more polite like "You're welcome"
     

    ESC85

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Actually, they didn't ask any bonus money.

    I just shared it with them.

    In this situation, still "no problem" is the better expression than the other one?
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I'm not sure why learners of English home in on questionable points of English that are highly dependent upon locale, context, education of of the participants, etc.

    (And, we've never touched on the Austrailian "no worries").

    Just say "you're welcome" and be done with it, which, as far as I can see, is the collective wisdom of all the knowledgeable folks who have offered advice above. I suggest you take it instead of pushing the issue.
     

    ESC85

    Senior Member
    Korean
    I'm not sure why learners of English home in on questionable points of English that are highly dependent upon locale, context, education of of the participants, etc.

    (And, we've never touched on the Austrailian "no worries").

    Just say "you're welcome" and be done with it, which, as far as I can see, is the collective wisdom of all the knowledgeable folks who have offered advice above. I suggest you take it instead of pushing the issue.
    The reason why I asked you "what would you say?" was a kind of joking. :)

    I already had gotten what you guys meant. Please, Don't take it seriously.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    The reason why I asked you "what would you say?" was a kind of joking. :)
    I already had gotten what you guys meant. Please, Don't take it seriously.
    We won't now that you tell us, but there was no way of knowing from your words alone. Unless they're well chosen, words on pages don't smile. That's why we have emoticons and extra words in the dictionary to express our real meaning.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I think the choice depends on where you are and the kind of English you use. I don't use you're welcome at all. (Overall, I think you're welcome is less common in BrE.) So my response could be 'My pleasure', 'Not at all', or 'No problem'. But equally, it could be just a smile or a nod with no response.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    And when I was last in Seattle, every waiter or store clerk to whom I said "thank you" repled with a cheery "You bet!"

    I found it weird, but better than the obnoxious and ill-mannered "No problem."

    ESC85, what the above thread tells you is that there are many people who will be irritated or offended by having someone say "no problem" in response to a thanks. Unless your intention is to risk irritating or offending the person to whom you are speaking, simply do not say "No problem" in response to "Thank you."
     

    emanko

    Senior Member
    Arabic- Egyptian
    Hello

    Even though I'm a non-native speaker of English, but I have always found using "no problem" as a reply to "thank you" a little bit weird. It didn't make sense to me. And this is why I looked it up on the forum here.
    I can see that this thread is 8 years old, so I'd like to ask you: Has the language evolved during the past 8 years and "no problem" became more acceptable?

    Thank you
     

    AnythingGoes

    Senior Member
    English - USA (Midwest/Appalachia)
    Has the language evolved during the past 8 years and "no problem" became more acceptable?
    I don't think so. I'd say the phrase is used about as often now as it was then, and that it's no more or less acceptable.
     
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