You're welcome...(+Sarcasm)

Hi guys,

How would you say: 'you're welcome' with a hint of sarcasm if someone doesn't thank you for doing them a favour.

e.g. I go to the shop and buy my brother some sweets, I get back in and throw him them, he says nothing. I say 'you're welcome' suggesting that he should have thanked me.

It is a rubbish e.g. I know but all I can think up at the moment.

Can you use sarcasm in this way in Russian and how does sarcasm work, if at all?

Thanks in advance!
 
  • morzh

    Banned
    USA
    Russian
    You just say "пожалуйста". (or any other relevant "welcome") in the sarcastic tone of voice and the appropriate mimicking.

    the longer the phrase the better it allows to relay sarcasm.

    Many will do:

    Пожалуйста
    Да что Вы, что Вы - не стоит благодарностей.
    С моим полным удовольствием!
    Не стОит!
    Да Бога ради!

    И т.д.



    In your particular case I would use : "Не стоит благодарностей".
     

    morzh

    Banned
    USA
    Russian
    kind of "пжжжжалста"? :D
    Yep. That one's good, though it also adds humor to sarcasm, I think. :)

    I would use this as a sarcastic response to something that was actually said i/o "thank you", or to a sarcastic "thank you" to return the sarcasm.

    To the silent treatment I would use "Не стоит благодарностей" with the sarcastic face.
     

    Wertis

    Banned
    Russian
    Hi guys,

    How would you say: 'you're welcome' with a hint of sarcasm if someone doesn't thank you for doing them a favour.

    e.g. I go to the shop and buy my brother some sweets, I get back in and throw him them, he says nothing. I say 'you're welcome' suggesting that he should have thanked me.

    It is a rubbish e.g. I know but all I can think up at the moment.

    Can you use sarcasm in this way in Russian and how does sarcasm work, if at all?

    Thanks in advance!
    An interesting question, but I still think I know what you are asking about. You've described the whole situation very clearly so that it's rather easy to suggest a version. In my language when we want someone to do something and don't have it done we say or do what we've been waiting for. For example, my sister promised yesterday she would clean the floor. The next day she pretends to have forgotten her yesterday's promise. I can start reproaching her for ignoring her promise and my request, but this may result in a squabble. Instead I gently say: "Ok, Marry, now I'd like to clean the floor because it really wants cleaning". In this situation she understands that she should stand up, take a hoover or a broom and start cleaning the floor. She may again show she hasn't understood what I have hinted at, but that's unlikely. So we say what we actually want another person to do.

    Now about your example. You haven't been thanked for a favour? Just say "Thank you" with a special intonation. The person you are talking to will realize you have nothing to thank him/her for and you have said "thank you" for a different reason, namely because these very words are what that person should have said to you. Is it clear?

    wertis
     
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