You're welcome / You are welcome (answer to " merci ")

Lunatrix

New Member
English Canada
How do you say "You're Welcome"? I don't know what is the right way because there are many.

Moderator's note: several threads have been merged to create this one.
 
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  • laurejamais

    New Member
    English/USA
    hi,

    um, what would be the context? some possibilities:

    "je vous en prie": very formal
    "de rien": informal
    "pas de quoi": informal
     

    somody

    Senior Member
    English
    De rien -- It was nothing
    Pas de quoi -- No question about it
    Avec plaisir -- With pleasure
     

    Agnès E.

    Senior Member
    France, French
    Actually, the more polite and formal way to reply to a thank you is: je vous/t'en prie.
    De rien and il n'y a pas de quoi are more popular (socially speaking).
    From most polite to most popular:

    - Je vous en prie (the most polite)
    - De rien (the one you can hear most)
    - Il n'y a pas de quoi (I should avoid this one)
     

    Xanthius

    Senior Member
    Following on from Angès' list... I'm sure that (ie in a bar) I've often heard 'c'est moi' as a reply to merci... would this also imply 'you're welcome' and would it be said as a reply to thank you in any other context? Or have I just imagined it?
     

    NobodySPerfect

    New Member
    Francais, Suisse
    For me, c'est moi means "c'est moi qui te remercie", so I think we use it when the person who says merci has done something for the other person too... I speek french but I'm not sure
     

    bernik

    Senior Member
    Brittany - french
    - Merci !
    - Je vous en prie !
    - Non, c'est moi (qui vous en prie) !
    - si, si, je vous en prie !
    - Mais puisque je vous dis que c'est moi !

    and after that, it can become really ugly...
     

    LV4-26

    Senior Member
    Xanthius said:
    Following on from Angès' list... I'm sure that (ie in a bar) I've often heard 'c'est moi' as a reply to merci... would this also imply 'you're welcome' and would it be said as a reply to thank you in any other context? Or have I just imagined it?
    No you haven't imagined it. "c'est moi" is also used pretty often. It means "c'est moi qui vous remercie". The bar owner or the waiter thank you for coming to their bar. You're the customer, after all, and you spend your money in their bar so thanking you is logical for them.
     

    LV4-26

    Senior Member
    The answer to "merci" doesn't only depend on the degree of formality but also on the speaker's mood.

    First of all, as previously mentionned, we'll rule out "il n'y a pas de quoi", not really because I think it's too populaire but simply because it's almost disappeared from our conversations. Maybe because it's too long, but I'm not sure as its shorter version "pas de quoi" isn't used any more than the full one.

    - De rien
    The most commonly used. Doesn't denote anything particular. It can be sincere or just uttered to be polite, without really thinking of it.

    - Je vous en prie
    I agree with Agnès that it's more formal.

    - Avec plaisir..
    Said in the South of France

    - Mais je vous en prie, c'est tout naturel, voyons !
    This kind of thing (length and choice of words may vary but that is the basic version) is said when you want to insist that you did nothing particular that the person should be grateful for.

    - C'est moi
    Said in the kind of situation I mentionned in my previous post. In that case, the speaker feels he's got reasons to be grateful as well.

    - *blank*
    Yes, it sometimes happen that no answer is given to a "merci". It shouldn't necessarily be taken badly. It can mean the person is shy and maybe embarrassed to be thanked and so hurries to speak of something else.
     

    Koyle

    Member
    French/France(Montpellier)
    I think that "de rien" is a little less formal than "je vous en prie" and "il n'y a pas de quoi". For instance, it's rare that you are replied "de rien" in a shop.
    Furthermore, I think there is this order of formalism:
    "je vous en prie" (usual in formal discussion) > "il n'y a pas de quoi" > "de rien" (friendly;) )

    bye
     
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    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    Thank you -- you're welcome
    Merci -- de rien / il n'y pas de quoi (standard) ;
    je vous en prie (more formal) ;
    c'est moi ! (that's what the grocer or other vendor may say to you--to mean he's the one that should be thanking you)
     
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    Already-Seen

    Senior Member
    US
    French - France
    I've noticed that in the US people almost always say "you're welcome" after a "thank you" whereas most people in France don't say anything after a "merci". You might get a "de rien" once in a while but it is not as systematic as the "you're welcome" you get in the US. Is it just me?
     

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    I've noticed that in the US people almost always say "you're welcome" after a "thank you" whereas most people in France don't say anything after a "merci". You might get a "de rien" once in a while but it is not as systematic as the "you're welcome" you get in the US. Is it just me?
    No, you are right, A-S. In the US people often learn the "rules" of please and thank you at an early age and that becomes a general social pattern.

    I think these norms vary in different countries around the world. You might want to post something in the Culture Forum if you want to learn more...
     

    AlBear

    New Member
    English, USA
    J’ai entendu dire « le plaisir est à moi » ou alors « c’est mon plaisir ». Sont-ils des anglicismes ces formules ?
    En anglais on dit « the pleasure is mine » ou simplement « my pleasure ». Donc je me demande si je ne les aie pas entendues d’un anglophone qui parlait français plutôt que d’un français.
     

    Yittle

    Senior Member
    English
    Koyle said that is is rare that you are replied "de rien" in a shop.
    So, "Je vous en prie" would be a better reply in that situation?

    What about between a teacher and student? Can the teacher reply "De rien" to the student and should the student use "De rien" with the teacher?

    I am trying to understand the degree of formality in certain situations in light of saying "You're welcome".
     

    ShineLikeStars

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Dans un contexte canadien est-ce qu'on dit ça me fait plaisir ou ça m'a fait plaisir en réponse à merci ?

    Merci beaucoup,
    SLS
     
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