< You're, your>; < it's, its>; <they're, their> = homophones?

DavidWolf

New Member
Mexican Spanish
Hello, I'm back :(, are those words homophones?, For example are they pronounce the same way it's and its? Help Please


I always thought that they were but someone told me that I was wrong.

I'm practicing excuse my bad english ;)...
 
  • PiotrR

    Member
    Chinese (Mandarin)
    They're all homophones, but the first two may differ in US. Whoever told you they're not, don't listen to that person. They don't know what they're talking about, and most likely have a bad, obviously non-native pronunciation themselves. You don't want such teachers.

    You're, your /jɔː(ɹ)/ (strong form, RP) /jʊɹ/ (strong form, GA) /jə(ɹ)/ (weak form, RP) /jɚ/ (weak form, GA)
    it's, its /ɪts/
    they're, their, there /ðɛə(ɹ)/ (RP) /ðɛɹ/ (GA)

    More info:
    Weak and strong forms of words in English
    RP = Received Pronunciation.
    GA = General American.

    I encourage you to learn IPA. You'll find it difficult to learn the correct pronunciation without it.
     
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    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    If I'm taking the trouble to speak clearly, or if I'm emphasizing the word, I pronounce you're and your differently - the first rhymes with pure, and the second with or. If I'm not, they both usually come out as "yer."

    It's and its are homophones, as are their, there and they're.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I suspected there might be differences between BE and AE, which is precisely why I specified that they sound the same to my 'English' ears.;) There will of course also be regional differences in pronounciation, on both sides of the pond.

    PS. I speak what is known these days as Standard Southern British English, which I think could be described as the modern version of what was known as 'BBC English'.;)
     

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    A: I think they're architects.
    B: No, they aren't architects, they're engineers.

    Source: Mark Foley and Diane Hall. New Total English Elementary.

    they're architects: /əɹɑː/ (BE) and /ɹɑr/ (AE)
    they're engineers: /əɹɛn/ (BE) and /ɹɛn/ (AE)

    The 'they' part in those expressions is pronounced as /ðɛ/ (BE and AE)

    Is that a correct transcription?
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    Pronunciation of most words varies between individuals, social categories, situations, regions and countries.

    Homophones have the SAME standard pronunciation as each other.


    As a speaker of British English I regard:

    New and knew as homophones.

    There and their as homophones.

    Its and it's as homophones.


    You're and your are NOT homophones. Try saying: "You're riding on your bicycle."

    They're and their are NOT homophones. Try saying: "They're eating their lunch."


    I generally hear two syllables in "you're" (as in "ewer") and in "they're", but only one in "your" and "their".

    Even when "you're" is spoken as one long syllable, it is still different from "your" (which rhymes with "pore" and "pour").
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    You're and your are NOT homophones. Try saying: "You're riding on your bicycle."

    They're and their are NOT homophones. Try saying: "They're eating their lunch."


    I hear two syllables in "you're" and in "they're", but only one in "your" and "their".
    You surprise me, Linkway. They're homophones for me.
     

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    they're architects: /ðɛəɹɑː/ (BE)

    They're eating their lunch: /ðɛəɹˈiːtɪŋ ðɛəlʌntʃ/

    There is a sort of 'r' sound linking 'they're' and 'eating.' Is that correct?
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    You're and your are NOT homophones. Try saying: "You're riding on your bicycle."

    They're and their are NOT homophones. Try saying: "They're eating their lunch."


    I generally hear two syllables in "you're" (as in "ewer") and in "they're", but only one in "your" and "their".

    Even when "you're" is spoken as one long syllable, it is still different from "your" (which rhymes with "pore" and "pour").
    Where do you live? It must be regional because I don't distinguish pour/pore. I'm Midlands/ North West England

    I might agree about the extra beat in they're compared to their, but I am sure I don't do that with you're.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    You're and your are NOT homophones. Try saying: "You're riding on your bicycle."
    If I speak quickly, both you're and your just become . If I speak deliberately and unnaturally emphasise you're and your, I'd probably say jɔː. I am aware that some people will not fuse the vowels in you're and say juːə or jʊə. Then we need to think about how for many people poor, sure and tour have ɔː rather than ʊə.
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    I readily accept that different people may pronounce the same words differently or different words in the same way.

    Using Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary (OALD) online as a reference which has audio and IPA transcription for each item:

    You're: BrE /jʊə(r)/ , /jɔː(r)/

    Your: BrE /jɔː(r)/ ; BrE weak form /jə(r)/

    Regardless of whether one is familiar with IPA symbols, it is clear that the pronunciation of YOU'RE and YOUR in British English are different from each other.


    OALD does however indicate that THEY'RE and THERE are pronounced the same, but I often hear them pronounced differently.

    Try saying this. There, there. (Parent soothing child.)
    And then compare with this: They're there! (Locating lost items.)

    I am simply saying that many British people, including educated speakers and media professionals pronounce THEY'RE and THERE a bit differently from each other and that's what I do.


    I don't distinguish pour/pore.
    Neither do I. I was saying that after the initial consonants, YOUR has the same sound as PORE which is the same sound as PORE.

    Perhaps, my point is clearly expressed as:

    For me, YOUR and YAW are (almost) homophones of each other. And YOU'RE and EWER are (almost) homophones of each other, but not of YOUR and YAW.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I readily accept that different people may pronounce the same words differently or different words in the same way.
    :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:
    Using Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary (OALD) online as a reference which has audio and IPA transcription for each item:

    You're: BrE /jʊə(r)/ , /jɔː(r)/

    Your: BrE /jɔː(r)/ ; BrE weak form /jə(r)/
    Your YOU'RE is /jʊə(r)/, unlike your YOUR; my YOU'RE is /jɔː(r)/, like my YOUR.:D
     

    Scrawny goat

    Senior Member
    English - Ireland
    Perhaps, my point is clearly expressed as:

    For me, YOUR and YAW are (almost) homophones of each other. And YOU'RE and EWER are (almost) homophones of each other, but not of YOUR and YAW.
    Excellently put. Those pairs are nowhere near homophones for me, which makes it much easier for me to understand where the other heated disagreements are coming from. I was scratching my head before.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Scrawny goat and Linkway, I expect you also have /ʊə(r)/ in poor and tour and sure? (See Nat's post 11.)

    ......

    Edit: I have /ʊə/ in relatively few words: they include pure and tour, but not poor and sure.
     
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    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    they're architects: /ðɛəɹɑː/ (BE)

    They're eating their lunch: /ðɛəɹˈiːtɪŋ ðɛəlʌntʃ/

    There is a sort of 'r' sound linking 'they're' and 'eating.' Is that correct?
    It isn't a "sort of 'r' sound": it is the actual R consonant ending the word "they're".

    If by "linking" you mean we don't separate the R sound from the vowel that starts the next word, you are correct. That is true with most consonants ending a word, when the next word starts with a vowel.

    In terms of syllables, it is reasonable to say that the ending consonant (r, t, n, etc.) starts the next syllable. And if thinking of it that way makes it easier to pronounce, say it that way.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    they're architects: /ðɛəɹɑː/ (BE)

    They're eating their lunch: /ðɛəɹˈiːtɪŋ ðɛəlʌntʃ/

    There is a sort of 'r' sound linking 'they're' and 'eating.' Is that correct?
    Prompted by doji's post 18: if you're asking about normally non-rhotic BrE pronunciation, then, yes, BrE-speakers will often, between vowels, pronounce a linking /r/ that they wouldn't pronounce if the word ending in a written <r(e)> was spoken in isolation.
     
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    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Edit: I have /ʊə/ in relatively few words: they include pure and tour...
    I find this hard to believe. (I must give you a ring and trick you into pronouncing them fast enough for me :D )

    At least your pure should have the /j/ sound - /pjʊə/. Which is, basically, how it should normally be pronounced, except when we speak fast we do not have the time 'to glide' for too long and it becomes /pjɔː/
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I wouldn't be surprised at anything, boozer! In Singapore, we typically have pure /pjɔː/ and cure /kjɔː/ but sure /ʃʊə/ and poor /pʊə/, whereas most younger English English speakers swap the /ʊə/ and /ɔː/ around for those words.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I wouldn't be surprised at anything, boozer! In Singapore, we typically have pure /pjɔː/ and cure /kjɔː/ but sure /ʃʊə/ and poor /pʊə/
    Me neither. In large parts of Lancashire it's typically /pjuːwə/, /kjuːwə/, /ʃuːwə/ and /puːwə/:D
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    ... In large parts of Lancashire it's typically /pjuːwə/, /kjuːwə/, /ʃuːwə/ and /puːwə/
    :thumbsup: In the Midlands too. People in the south of England typically can't get their tongues round this, but where I come from it's:

    You're : /'ju:ə/ or sometimes /'ju:wə/
    Your : /jɔ:/
    They're : /'ðeɪə/
    There, their : /ðeəʳ/.
     
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