youth / youngster / young people

ning8907

New Member
chinese
For "youth", "youngster" and "young people", is there any difference and which one is more formal?
Thanks!
 
  • ning8907

    New Member
    chinese
    hi Rover_KE,
    I want to use them in the essay of my ielts test. The topic is about the drug abuse among young people.
    because I don't want to repeat the same wrod in one essay for many times, so I am just wondering if these words have exactly the same meaning so that I can switch between them.
    Thanks!
     

    EStjarn

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    The thread Young and youngster includes the following advice:
    I caution you aganist using the word "youngster," especially to American students. "Youngster" sounds very condescending.
    I would suggest that 'young people' (rather than 'youngsters') is a more neutral synonym of 'youth'.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    To an American, "youngster" is someone distinctly younger than the drug-abusing age group you're discussing (teens through twenties, I assume). We think of youngsters as being of elementary-school age.

    Youth
    and young people would both work for your essay.
     

    Kacy.H

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    To an American, "youngster" is someone distinctly younger than the drug-abusing age group you're discussing (teens through twenties, I assume). We think of youngsters as being of elementary-school age.

    Youth
    and young people would both work for your essay.
    May I ask, if "youngsters" is an informal way to say"children"?
    Thanks
     

    Kacy.H

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Please give us the sentence in which you would use it, Kacy.H. In what situation would you be saying this?
    Children should be taught financial skills, such as savings and investments, from a young age.
    To what extent do you agree or disagree?--
    This an IELTS essay question

    When paraphrasing, can I change "children" to "youngsters"?
    e.g. It is argued that youngsters should learn money management skills early in their childhood.

    The dictionary says"The noun youngster is a casual word meaning child"
    So, I was wondering if "youngster" is too informal for academic essay?

    Thanks
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    I agree that it's too casual for an essay. In addition, at least to me, the word is dated: the kind of word someone older than me (and I'm not young) would use to describe kids.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    The dictionary says"The noun youngster is a casual word meaning child". Does this mean "youngster" is an informal word?
    According to Oxford Dictionaries, no: it just means A child, young person, or young animal.

    But if you have a look at their 'More example sentences', you'll see it's used mainly to refer to an individual, or to a specific group of youngsters. :)
     

    semeeran

    Senior Member
    Indian Tamil, India
    "Our youngsters can take part in the school football match. "
    Is this sentence OK?
    Please comment.
    Thanks.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    "Our youngsters can take part in the school football match. "
    Is this sentence OK?
    Please comment.
    It would depend on who "our" refers to. If it's the children's parents it would probably work, although I'm not sure how many parents these days refer to their kids as their "youngsters."

    Or did you have a different context in mind? :confused:
     

    Erebos12345

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    There's nothing grammatically wrong with your sentence semeeran, but as mentioned in #12, the word would only be used by older people, who would nowadays, no longer refer to their own (adult) children as "our youngsters."

    I can't think of a single context in which anyone would say "our youngsters." "Our kids" or "our children" are far more natural.
     
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