You've got the rest of your life.

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MrRise

Senior Member
Russian
When Moriarti got a call, he said:" Do you mind if you got that...".
Sherlock said:" Oh,yes,please. You've got a rest of your life."

The rest of your life? What for? To speak through the phone?
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    It is impossible for us to know, based on the sentences you provide. Sherlock is referring to something else in the plot.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Hello, MrRise. :)

    Please tell us where you saw that and what else was happening.

    (I would have expected "Do you mind if I get that...." Or was he asking Sherlock to answer the phone?)
     

    MrRise

    Senior Member
    Russian
    It is impossible for us to know, based on the sentences you provide. Sherlock is referring to something else in the plot.
    Hello, MrRise. :)

    Please tell us where you saw that and what else was happening.

    (I would have expected "Do you mind if I get that...." Or was he asking Sherlock to answer the phone?)
    Season 2 series 1.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Season 2 series 1.
    I think we need more than that. You can't expect members to find and watch a whole TV programme.

    What was happening at the time these lines are spoken? And was it really "Do you mind if you got that..."? Or was it "Do you mind if I get that....", as Cagey suggested?
     

    MrRise

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I think we need more than that. You can't expect members to find and watch a whole TV programme.

    What was happening at the time these lines are spoken? And was it really "Do you mind if you got that..."? Or was it "Do you mind if I get that....", as Cagey suggested?
    Yes, I made a mistake. Do you mind if I get that is there, it's 1st minute 45th second start from begining.

    The situation is like:
    Sherlock pointed the gun on the bomb.
    Moriarti and Sherlock were standing and waiting, but suddenly Moriarti's phone started ringing.

    - Do you mind if I get that?..
    - Oh,yes,please. You've got the rest of your life.

    It's all. I think.
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    Ah ha!

    Moriarti: Do you mind if I answer the phone?
    Sherlock: Yes, go ahead. You have all the rest of your life to do so (because your life is going to be very short, since I am about to kill you).
     

    MrRise

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Ah ha!

    Moriarti: Do you mind if I answer the phone?
    Sherlock: Yes, go ahead. You have all the rest of your life to do so (because your life is going to be very short, since I am about to kill you).
    Nice! Maybe Sherlock's meant that he's gonna catch him, but as well as just shot in the bomb and all they were dead. Thanks!
     

    Vronsky

    Senior Member
    Russian - Russia
    But what do the answer "Yes" to the question "Do you mind if I ..." mean?
    'Yes, I mind.'
    or
    'Yes, I don't mind"
     
    mind = bother/disturb someone a lot

    Do you mind?

    Yes, I mind. ( Yes, it would bother me. Don't proceed)

    No, I don't mind. (No, it wouldn't bother me. Go ahead)

    Do you mind if...= Would it bother you if...

    (Probably if you have further questions about that you should open another thread.:))
     

    Vronsky

    Senior Member
    Russian - Russia
    mind = bother/disturb someone a lot

    Do you mind?

    Yes, I mind. ( Yes, it would bother me. Don't proceed)

    No, I don't mind. (No, it wouldn't bother me. Go ahead)

    (Probably if you have further questions about that you should open another thread.:))
    But how then should I interpret Sherlock's answer?

    'Do you mind if I answer the phone?'
    'Yes, go ahead.' = Yes, I mind. Go ahead.

    Am I right?
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    I'm not sure what Sherlock said, but it would not be unusual for this dialog to happen:

    A: Do you mind?
    B: Yes, go ahead?

    A says "Do you mind [if I answer the phone]?" but he really means "may I answer the phone?" B does not actually reply to what he said but rather to what he meant.

    Some kinds of questions are always open to confusion. For example:

    Alice: I'm thinking of leaving early; you won't mind will you?
    Boss: No.

    Does the boss mean "No, I do not mind" or "No, you may not leave early"?

    So it's always better to reply with a fuller answer. "No, I don't mind." or "No, I need you to work."
     

    Vronsky

    Senior Member
    Russian - Russia
    Some kinds of questions are always open to confusion. For example:

    Alice: I'm thinking of leaving early; you won't mind will you?
    Boss: No.
    Yes, it's very true for negative questions.

    What actually was in the film:

    [Continuing from the cliffhanger in "The Great Game", Sherlock is pointing a gun at John's explosive coat. Moriarty stares at Sherlock's decision with a touch of fear. Suddenly Staying Alive by Bee Gees plays. It's Moriarty's mobile phone]
    Jim Moriarty: Mind if I get that?
    Sherlock Holmes: Oh no, please. You've got the rest of your life.
    [Moriarty answers his phone]

    I think it's fine to answer the question "Do you mind if ..." with "Yes" (= Yes, I do. I mind) or "No" (No, I don't. I don't mind). It would be strange to hear "Yes, please."
     
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