Yuppie

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Cracker Jack

Senior Member
Hi. I would just like to know how a yuppie is known in your respective languages. Yuppie come from the abbreviation YUP, which stands for Young Urban Professional. Yuppies may be fresh college graduates or those in their 30s brimming with idealism and embarking on their careers.
Most work in metropolitan area or within the financial district.

Yuppies may be within the lower rung of the corporate ladder or some with postgrad or MBA. Or else, they work in the morning and do post-grad after office hours on Saturdays. Yuppies usually engage in unwinding activities Friday and Saturday nights in a club, bar, disco. They may opt for a movie or theater or even concert.

Thanks in advance.
 
  • belén

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Spain, Catalan, Mallorca
    Same in Spain. It was a US invention and as such, it was never translated, for we didn't really have yuppies at that time.. Later, it became sort of fashionable, to call young executives "yuppies" but it was just an eighties thing that at least in Spain, has been almost forgotten.

    Cheers,
    Be
     

    Cracker Jack

    Senior Member
    It seems to me that it is not translated and is known as such the world over. This may be due to the influence of American movies and TV shows. Probably the only difference is how it is written in Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Thai, Russian, Arabic, Hebrew, etc. Thanks a lot.
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    I believe that mauricinhos and patricinhas are pampered upper class boys and girls. Not quite the same as yuppies.
     

    Josh_

    Senior Member
    U.S., English
    Yuppie is just short for young urban professional. It definitely does seem like an American concept and it would probably need to be translated as a phrase into other languages. In Arabic I would suggest

    شاب محترف ومدني
    shaabun muHtarifun wa-madanii (male)

    شابة محترفة ومدنية
    shaabatun muHtarifatun wa-madaniyyatun (female)



     

    cameo

    Member
    Chinese, Taiwan
    In Chinese: 雅痞. Pretty much used to call "those who in their 30s brimming with idealism and embarking on their careers.Most work in metropolitan area or within the financial district."
    But that's how we understand it in Taiwan; not sure about Mainland China.
     

    SofiaB

    Senior Member
    English Asia
    Outsider said:
    I believe that mauricinhos and patricinhas are pampered upper class boys and girls. Not quite the same as yuppies.
    They are both so you are right and yuppies is also right.
    It is slang "giria".
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Josh Adkins said:
    Yuppie is just short for young urban professional. It definitely does seem like an American concept and it would probably need to be translated as a phrase into other languages. In Arabic I would suggest

    شاب محترف ومدني
    shaabun muHtarifun wa-madanii (male)

    شابة محترفة ومدنية
    shaabatun muHtarifatun wa-madaniyyatun (female)



    If I understand the phrase correctly, "professional" here is used in its literal sense, i.e. associated with a profession, not exhibiting the quality of professionalism. Therefore, I would not translate it as محترف, which conveys the second of the two connotations.

    I would suggest

    شاب مدني ومهني
    (shaabbun madaniyyun wamihaniyyun)

    and

    شابة مدنية ومهنية
    (shaabbatun madaniyyatun wamihaniyyatun)
     
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