Zap off

Laablae

Member
Thai
Hello,
I think i have seen this word before in a comic book or in a movie but I'm not quite sure...
Is there a word "zap off" that means to speedily move to somewhere else?
Like... He zapped off the room. Or maybe he zapped out off the room.
Any ideas?

Thank you in advance guys.
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I suppose you could use it this way. Zap is in our dictionary as a verb meaning to "move quickly" (among oher things) so tagging "off" on the end of it seems OK to me.

    He zapped off out OF the room. (note second OF is only one F).
     

    Laablae

    Member
    Thai
    I have never heard "zap" used that way. Perhaps you are think of zip?
    Yeah I looked into Cambridge dictionary and it says zap and zip are synonyms.
    However, I haven't used zip in other ways than "a zip" on clothes.... quite new for me : )
    zap verb (GO QUICKLY)
    [ I or T, usually + adv/prep ] uk informal to go somewhere or do something quickly:

    Have I got time to zap into town and do some shopping?
    George zapped through his homeworkand rushed out to play basketball.
    There are now over a million American fax machines zapping (= sendingquickly) messages from coast to coast.
    See also
    zip
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    I'm not convinced by the 'move quickly' definition in the WR dictionary. Not that I'm saying it's wrong, just that it doesn't really fit in the context of people. Note that the one example given is "high-voltage currents zapping overhead", which at thousands of kilometres a second is rather faster than I could manage, even in my younger days (even if I were zapped by an electric shock).
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    There are examples of zap being used to mean people moving fast in the OED. They date from 1968, so relatively recent usage.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I’ve never heard “zap off”. But neither have I heard zap used in the same way as zip to mean buzz around very quickly.

    (A possible clue about this is that the online Oxford dictionary gives its usual 20 genuine usage examples for zip in that sense, but could apparently only find 4 for zap.)
     

    Jimbob_Disco

    Senior Member
    British English
    I’ve never heard “zap off”. But neither have I heard zap used in the same way as zip to mean buzz around very quickly.

    (A possible clue about this is that the online Oxford dictionary gives its usual 20 genuine usage examples for zip in that sense, but could apparently only find 4 for zap.)
    I agree there, I think I’d understand ‘zip off’, or maybe better ‘buzz off’.
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    I’ve never heard “zap off”. But neither have I heard zap used in the same way as zip to mean buzz around very quickly.
    I agree. As far as I'm concerned:

    I'm just going to zip over to the store and pick up some milk and eggs. :tick:
    I'm just going to zap over to the store and pick up some milk and eggs. :cross:
     

    Laablae

    Member
    Thai
    I agree. As far as I'm concerned:

    I'm just going to zip over to the store and pick up some milk and eggs. :tick:
    I'm just going to zap over to the store and pick up some milk and eggs. :cross:
    so "zip" is used more often I assume?
    But still it's not an aggressive or impolite word isn't it?
    I mean the zip and the zap?
     
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