Zdzich / Zdzichu

questin

Senior Member
Spanish
Hi there!
Lately I've heard this word in some different situation.
1. Is it the diminutive of Zdzisław, am I right?
2. Does it means a line of cocaine or drugs in general?
3. Is it a kind of derogatory way of naming a man you don't know his name or you don't want to know?
Sorry for my English and for not having an context.
Thanks in advance,
Miguel.
 
  • zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    1. This is just another form of Zdzisław, yet kind of colloquial. I wouldn't use it to address my boss even if he agreed to be called by his first name.
    2. I've never heard of using this name with reference to drugs. Don't think so.
    3. Could be, but Janusz is more common.
     

    questin

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    1. This is just another form of Zdzisław, yet kind of colloquial. I wouldn't use it to address my boss even if he agreed to be called by his first name.
    2. I've never heard of using this name with reference to drugs. Don't think so.
    3. Could be, but Janusz is more common.
    Thank you very much!
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    1. This is just another form of Zdzisław, yet kind of colloquial. I wouldn't use it to address my boss even if he agreed to be called by his first name.
    2. I've never heard of using this name with reference to drugs. Don't think so.
    3. Could be, but Janusz is more common.
    I wouldn't call Zdzich "just another form" of Zdzisław, because this can be confusing for foreigners, especially anglophone persons. In English today all "forms" of a first name are almost equal. Both William and Billy can be used to address an adult man by strangers. This is not the case in Polish, and other Slavic languages. It is more like in Spanish Francisco and Paco. First names kan be modified in a way that make them diminutives (Rosa - Rosita) or augmentatives (the last something like mujer-> mujeruca in Spanish). Surprisingly,, both diminutives and augmentatives can be used as terms of endearment, as is the case of Zdzich. A diminutive of Zdzisław can be Zdziś, Zdzisio, or Zdzisiek. The first two used mostly by parents for a son, the latter can be used among adult friends. The augmentative Zdzich or Zdzicho (the latter mor popular nowadays) is also used among friends and family, as an intimate form. It will be also a favourite form in a group of schoolboys, as it sounds tougher that the diminutive.
    Zdzichu is a slang form of Zdzicho, and is regarded as something tougher. Both diminutives and augmentatives can end in U instead of O, but this is regarded by many as uncultivated (incorrect Polish).
     

    questin

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    I wouldn't call Zdzich "just another form" of Zdzisław, because this can be confusing for foreigners, especially anglophone persons. In English today all "forms" of a first name are almost equal. Both William and Billy can be used to address an adult man by strangers. This is not the case in Polish, and other Slavic languages. It is more like in Spanish Francisco and Paco. First names kan be modified in a way that make them diminutives (Rosa - Rosita) or augmentatives (the last something like mujer-> mujeruca in Spanish). Surprisingly,, both diminutives and augmentatives can be used as terms of endearment, as is the case of Zdzich. A diminutive of Zdzisław can be Zdziś, Zdzisio, or Zdzisiek. The first two used mostly by parents for a son, the latter can be used among adult friends. The augmentative Zdzich or Zdzicho (the latter mor popular nowadays) is also used among friends and family, as an intimate form. It will be also a favourite form in a group of schoolboys, as it sounds tougher that the diminutive.
    Zdzichu is a slang form of Zdzicho, and is regarded as something tougher. Both diminutives and augmentatives can end in U instead of O, but this is regarded by many as uncultivated (incorrect Polish).
    That's a very interesting clarification, thank you.
    Would be all of those called "zdrobnienia" regardless which is the case? (Perhaps I should have open a new thread for this question...)
    Thanks again.
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    That's a very interesting clarification, thank you.
    Would be all of those called "zdrobnienia" regardless which is the case? (Perhaps I should have open a new thread for this question...)
    Thanks again.
    Well, we have both zdrobnienia and zgrubienia, but the use of them overlaps, as you could see, so the terminology is somewhat confused.
     

    grassy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    1. Is it the diminutive of Zdzisław, am I right?
    2. Does it means a line of cocaine or drugs in general?
    3. Is it a kind of derogatory way of naming a man you don't know his name or you don't want to know?
    1 Yes, sort of: in the same way that Bob stands for Robert
    2 Not that I am aware of, but who knows? It may be used among drug addicts.
    3 It could conceivably be used like that but it would not be common.
     

    haes

    Member
    Polish - Poland
    Zdzichu would be dimunitive from Zdzisław, but in a rough way - you would use it to your buddy with whom you have drank vodka after work or with whom you were stealing food coupons during the 80s (and did 2 year sentence for this). Hard to imagine anyone below 60, who could be called this way.
     

    grassy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Zdzichu would be dimunitive from Zdzisław, but in a rough way - you would use it to your buddy with whom you have drank vodka after work or with whom you were stealing food coupons during the 80s (and did 2 year sentence for this).
    Not necessarily. I know one Zdzisław and his wife calls him Ździchu.
     
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