Zenith

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Aidanriley

Senior Member
English
I'm not sure how to structure a sentence with "zenith" to say that a planet is directly above a speaker's head:

My tries:
The planet is in its zenith;
The planet is in zenith;
The planet is at zenith;
The planet is at its zenith.

I think the last one sounds best, but it could be completely wrong. Any help would be appreciated, thanks.
 
  • I agree it's "at its zenith" because we're not using "in transit" to describe motion, or "in Capricorn"to describe some supposed mood or powers for an extended period which also implies slow motion, but just merely "at its highest point (zenith)" as though describing where the needle on a watch dial is at, not how it got there, with the fact that it will not stay there being irrelevant.

    So it's not "in some thing" it's "at some where-marking place point- precisely."
     
    Last edited:

    EStjarn

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    I'm not sure how to structure a sentence with "zenith" to say that a planet is directly above a speaker's head. [...] Any help would be appreciated.
    When we say at zenith, we specifically mean "the point on the celestial sphere that is directly above the observer." When we say at its zenith, we mean "the highest point above the observer's horizon attained by a celestial body." (Ref.) Depending on where you are located, that highest point may or may not be right above you. For example, in the upper part of the northern hemisphere, no planets can be found at zenith, since they all lie close to the ecliptic. (Ref.) This means that it's only within roughly 30 degrees north and south of the equator that, when referring to a planet, at its zenith can equal at zenith. Beyond that limit, at its zenith will be a point increasingly closer to the horizon depending on how far away from the limit you're positioned.
     
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