zinc induced molting was selected

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tomonori

Member
Japanese
I am translating a report which was written by some guy from Pakistan, and it is really heavy to translate because it has tons of Pakistan English I think.

Here is the sentence below;
Based on this study and other literature reports, zinc induced molting was selected in the current study to induce the molt in white leg horn birds at the end of their first production cycle.


I think the sentence should be like this;
zinc which/that is induced molting was selected in the current.....

In that sentence, induced and selected are the main verbs, but it cannot be right.
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    It looks like the main subject is 'zinc-induced molting', that is mo(u)lting induced by zinc. Instead of a relative clause as in your rewriting, it's a compound adjective. The hyphen would clarify that 'induced' is not a finite verb here.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hello, Tomonori. "Zinc-induced molting" is molting that is produced or triggered by giving zinc to these birds.

    "Induced" in that phrase is working as an adjective.

    "...was selected in the current study to induce the molt..." is just a passive sentence. "Zinc-induced molting" (subject) was selected (simple past, passive) to induce (prepositional phrase used to explain the reason for selecting "Zinc-induced molting").

    There is nothing wrong with the grammar in this sentence. People who write scientific reports often use passive sentences to lend a sense of "objectivity" to the language.

    I hope this explanation helps you a little. :)
     

    tomonori

    Member
    Japanese
    Thank you for replying.
    And I still have a further question.

    In this case, "induced" is an adjective and I know that.
    But which should be better, past participle or present participle?

    Here is another example;
    She is a girl playing the piano.
    She is a girl played the piano.
    In these two sentences, The top one is correct but the bottom one is not correct.
    It should be like this;
    She is a girl who played the piano.

    Therefore,
    The sentence I explained before should be like this;
    Zinc inducing molting ...... or,
    Zinc which induced molting.......

    Am I correct?







    Hello, Tomonori. "Zinc-induced molting" is molting that is produced or triggered by giving zinc to these birds.

    "Induced" in that phrase is working as an adjective.

    "...was selected in the current study to induce the molt..." is just a passive sentence. "Zinc-induced molting" (subject) was selected (simple past, passive) to induce (prepositional phrase used to explain the reason for selecting "Zinc-induced molting").

    There is nothing wrong with the grammar in this sentence. People who write scientific reports often use passive sentences to lend a sense of "objectivity" to the language.

    I hope this explanation helps you a little. :)
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    If I understand your question correctly, Tomonori, you are wondering whether writing "zinc that/which induced molting" or "zinc-inducing molting" would be a good substitute for "zinc-induced molting". My answer is "No, it wouldn't".

    The subject is "molting that is/was induced by zinc". A good, short way to write that is "zinc-induced molting". If you use the phrase as it has been written, your reader will be sure to understand that the subject of the study isn't "molting that induces zinc" (zinc-inducing molting)??? or "the zinc that induced molting" (zinc which induced molting)???. If you need to rephrase this for a translation, you could use "molting that is/was triggered/induced by zinc".

    Your example with the girl and the piano doesn't really have much to do with the problem of "zinc-induced molting". Once again, it means "molting that is/was induced by zinc". I hope this helps. :)

    PS The person who wrote this study should have remembered to place a hyphen between "zinc" and "induced": "zinc-induced molting".
     

    tomonori

    Member
    Japanese
    I think I really understand what you explained,
    but still, I have a further more question.

    If you say ;
    Molting is induced by zinc,
    then the active sentence should be like this;
    Zinc induces molting.
    The material "zinc" induces molting, right ?

    Zinc is induced by molting ? No, it is not.


    Zinc which is induced by molting ..... ?
    Zinc which induced moulting......?
    Zinc induced molting.....?

    The top one is a totally different meaning.
    The middle one is "Molting was induced by zinc."
    The bottom one is "Zinc induced molting.(and zinc is a subject, induced is a verb, and molting is a object.)"


    "Zinc-induced molting" is not a past tense.
    in this case, induced is not a verb, it is an adjective(past participle).
    What is induced by ?
    Zinc, or molting?
    It is zinc, which means "zinc (that is) INDUCING molting" could be a subject, or,
    "Molting (that is) induced BY zinc" could be that too.


    Am I right ?










    If I understand your question correctly, Tomonori, you are wondering whether writing "zinc that/which induced molting" or "zinc-inducing molting" would be a good substitute for "zinc-induced molting". My answer is "No, it wouldn't".

    The subject is "molting that is/was induced by zinc". A good, short way to write that is "zinc-induced molting". If you use the phrase as it has been written, your reader will be sure to understand that the subject of the study isn't "molting that induces zinc" (zinc-inducing molting)??? or "the zinc that induced molting" (zinc which induced molting)???. If you need to rephrase this for a translation, you could use "molting that is/was triggered/induced by zinc".

    Your example with the girl and the piano doesn't really have much to do with the problem of "zinc-induced molting". Once again, it means "molting that is/was induced by zinc". I hope this helps. :)

    PS The person who wrote this study should have remembered to place a hyphen between "zinc" and "induced": "zinc-induced molting".
     
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