zine diali

  • kam01008

    New Member
    polish, Poland
    It is a message from my Moroccan friend, and it says: “bonne nuit zine diali”; Maybe it is a Moroccan dialect??
     

    ayed

    Senior Member
    Arabic(Saudi)
    Could it be :
    Zain ad-dalali which means his"beloved one--Sweetheart"?It is just a mere guess
     

    fatiha

    Senior Member
    ARABIC -MOROCCO
    Hi
    its a Moroccan dialect
    it means: my beauty
    الزين ديالي
    zine=beauty
    diali=for me

    titi
     

    Mery_Dian

    Member
    Moroccan Arabic - Morocco
    kam01008 said:
    Do you know which part of Morocco this dialect comes from?
    Hi kam01008,

    This phrase is actually common to all regions in Morocco.
    Zine : means beauty (as fatiha said) in Moroccan Arabic, and
    diali : means "my" or "mine"
    So, zine diali could be literally translated as "my beauty" ; but the phrase is an affectionate term of address, whose equivalent in English would be "sweetheart" or "honey"...
     

    ayed

    Senior Member
    Arabic(Saudi)
    So my guess is right?
    In Saudi, folk poets often describe their beloved ones"sweethearts"in their poems as:
    Zain al-Dalali
    Haseen al-Dalali
     

    suma

    Senior Member
    USA
    English, USA
    can someone explain what is this word "diali" is it from standard Arabic? how has is come to mean my or mine?

    never heard this before. thanks
     

    CarlosPerezMartinez

    Senior Member
    Spain, Spanish
    I was asked the same question by my Moroccan teacher when I was studying in Morocco. The fact is in their dialect they express possession by that word: dial- (diali, dialek, dialu..."el-kteb dialu= his book", etc.). He thought it comes from the Spanish "del" (of, from) which I doubt.
    Sorry but I have no answer to your question...for the moment.
     

    suma

    Senior Member
    USA
    English, USA
    OK interesting, it's a start anyway towards figuring where diali comes from.

    the Egyptians have a similar thing I believe, b'ta3ee, b'ta3ak, b'ta3ah, etc.
    il-3arabiyah b'ta3ah mu3atalah
    his car is not working
     

    ayed

    Senior Member
    Arabic(Saudi)
    In Saudi , we say sometimes :
    Instead of saying" My book -- Kitabi (كتابي), we say " al-Kitab haqqi"(الكتاب حقي)
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    suma said:
    Egyptians have a similar thing I believe, b'ta3ee, b'ta3ak, b'ta3ah, etc.
    il-3arabiyah b'ta3ah mu3atalah
    his car is not working
    Nice try, but we don't say mu3talah in colloquial, we say 3aTlaana عطلانة
    and "his car" can either be : 3arabitoh/3arabeyyetoh عربيته or el-3arabeyya bta3toh العربية بتاعته.

    I guess that the etymology of this word بتاع is from the word تبع (taba3) which mean affiliate or pertain to.
     

    Mery_Dian

    Member
    Moroccan Arabic - Morocco
    MarcB said:
    في ليبيا و تونس يقولون متاع​
    In Moroccan Arabic we also use interchangeably (depending on the region) "ديال " and "نتاع " (originally "متاع").
    "ديال " is, by and large, more widespread. We also express possession or ownership in colloquial Moroccan Arabic by the final "ي " (i: sound) as in most Arab dialects, like in "كتابي " or "جاري " ...
    NB: In Algerian Arabic, they, omit the "m" sound and would rather say "تاع " (ta3).

    suma said:
    can someone explain what is this word "diali" is it from standard Arabic? how has is come to mean my or mine?
    As for the etymology of dial, I do not have an exact idea about its origin. But as far as I know, Moroccan Arabic is a mix of Classical Arabic, Berber/Amazigh, French and Spanish, and has been much influenced by the Berber morphology and sound pattern.
    I don't think that there exists even in old classical Arabic a word whose root is akin to diali. The same thing applies to berber/Amazigh, in which the possessive pronoun has no similarity with diali.

    CarlosPerezMartinez said:
    it comes from the Spanish "del" (of, from)
    Hence, I assume that CarlosPerezMartinez's theory is the most plausible one. It is indeed possible that "dial" derives from the Spanish "del" and went through the process of "moroccanisation". This wouldn't be surprising, bearing in mind that some Spanish words have probably been brought by Moriscos who spoke Andalusi Arabic (a variety heavily influenced by Spanish - more exactly Castilian), while other words might have been brought in through trade contacts with Spain.

    Meryem
     
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